David Kirkpatrick

June 3, 2009

Beyond the wii

Filed under: Arts, Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 4:56 pm

Via KurzweilAI.net — There’s a lot of development going on to take the Nintendo’s wii concept to the next stage — pure guesture, no controller.

Here’s links to Sony’s offering as introduced at E3:

Sony latest to demo videogame motion-sensing controller
PhysOrg.com, June 3, 2009

Sony on Tuesday demonstrated a prototype motion-sensing videogame controller.

A camera tracks the player’s movements, and software translates their movements to those of onscreen characters.

 
Read Original Article>>

April 23, 2009

Medical wii?

Filed under: et.al., Media, Science — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 11:43 pm

Looks like it. The wii is a very cool console platform and I wouldn’t be surprised if more applications beyond gaming are explored.

The release:

For Release: April 23, 2009


Popular Gaming System May Offer Radiologists an Alternative Way to View Patient Images

The popular Wii gaming remote may offer radiologists a fun, alternative method to using a standard mouse and keyboard to navigate through patient images, according to a study performed at the New-York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York, NY. The remote may also offer radiologists relief from repetitive motion injuries as a result of using a mouse and keyboard.

“We have developed a new fun and exciting way for radiologists to navigate through patient images using hand movements instead of basic keyboard and mouse clicks,” said Cliff Yeh, MD, Matthew Amans, MD, and George Shih, MD, lead authors of the study. “The device from the Nintendo Wii gaming system has both an infrared sensor and an accelerometer, which when used together, can allow for flexible ways to interact with radiology images,” they said.

“All the basic features that a radiologist routinely requires can be performed using the hand held device. For this study, new software for viewing radiology images which interfaces with the Wii remote was developed in conjunction with computer scientists Lu Zheng and Michael Brown, PhD, both from the National University of Singapore, in Singapore and both co-authors of the study,” according to Drs. Yeh, Amans and Shih.

“The traditional keyboard mouse user interface limits the way a radiologist can interpret images and manage an ever increasing workload. The Wii remote may alleviate those limitations. In addition repetitive motion injuries may be mitigated by altering usage between a device like the Wii remote and the traditional mouse because they use different sets of muscles. Small movements can manipulate the image on the screen and buttons can change windows and move between different series’. It is a lot more flexible than just a simple mouse,” they said.

“The Wii remote along with the software the authors developed is currently just a prototype and is not FDA approved for clinical use. We are constantly updating the software,” said Dr. Shih, senior author of the study. “We can only hope that in the next twenty years the mouse and keyboard will be replaced by something like the Wii remote,” said Drs. Yeh, Amans and Shih.

This study will be presented at the 2009 ARRS Annual Meeting in Boston, MA, on Monday, April 27. For a copy of the full study, please contact Heather Curry via email at hcurry@arrs.org.

About ARRS

The American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) was founded in 1900 and is the oldest radiology society in the United States. Its monthly journal, the American Journal of Roentgenology, began publication in 1906. Radiologists from all over the world attend the ARRS annual meeting to participate in instructional courses, scientific paper presentations and scientific and commercial exhibits related to the field of radiology. The Society is named after the first Nobel Laureate in Physics, Wilhelm Röentgen, who discovered the x-ray in 1895. ###

January 7, 2009

wii fit works

Filed under: et.al., Science, Sports, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 1:43 am

I’ve yet to mess around with a wii fit, but did finally break down and last week opened a console I’d bought for resell. The game unit is definitely everything it’s cracked up to be. Very fun, very innovative and even the basic “wii Sports” games are something of a workout.  Hell, the Clone Wars lightsaber game is downright tiring.

Plus this post on the wii console ties into my next post — a bit of fiction in which “wii Sports” golf plays a minor role.

The release:

Wii Fit a promising tool for all ages

Game’s health measurements flawed

MANHATTAN, KAN. — While some emerging technologies can create environments that require very little physical effort, one Kansas State University researcher thinks games like Nintendo’s Wii Fit can help promote physical rather than sedentary activities for people of all ages.

“I think there is a great potential to develop ways to promote physical activity through technology,” said David Dzewaltowski, professor and head of the department of kinesiology at K-State and director of the university’s Community Health Institute. “Kids innately like to move, so I believe that there is a big future in games that use emerging technologies and require movement because the games will be enjoyed by children and also be more healthy than existing games.”

In a commentary published in the October 2008 Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, Dzewaltowski discussed how technology is changing our everyday life and affecting our health.

Wii Fit has games that incorporate yoga, strength training, balance and aerobics. The games are interactive and require the player to physically move, which is better than nothing, Dzewaltowski said. It uses a balance board and allows gamers to simulate challenges like snowboarding down a mountain.

“Anything that gets people to move more than they have in the past is positive, but if people are trying to replace physical activity that demands more movement with the Wii, then that will be negative,” Dzewaltowski said.

He said it is difficult in a small indoor space to replicate the intensity of some real-life physical activities, though dance video games are effective at demanding physical movements that require caloric expenditure.

“The caloric expenditure demanded by an activity depends on the energy necessary to move the body’s weight to complete the task and how long you perform the task,” Dzewaltowski said.

He added that different activities demand different amounts of caloric expenditure, like playing a game of soccer, which demands much more energy expenditure than bowling or playing the outfield in baseball.

Dzewaltowski said Wii Fit can be an effective tool to create or maintain a healthy lifestyle for some people because it follows the basic principles for adhering to an exercise program, like having physical activity goals, tracking those goals and evaluating the progress.

Wii Fit measures players’ body mass index, or BMI, which is a weight evaluation based on height and weight. Dzewaltowski said this a good screening tool for adults, meaning if the game categorizes them as being overweight or obese, they should seek more information from a health professional who can better evaluate the level of body fat. However, he said the calculation is unsuitable for children.

“For children, the BMI calculation has to be expressed based on age and gender growth charts, and it doesn’t do that,” Dzewaltowski said. “Due to children’s age and gender differences in growth, the adult BMI calculators don’t work. My use of the Wii BMI calculator showed that it was inappropriate for children and would categorize children incorrectly.”

The game also gives players a Wii Fit Age, which is measured by the player’s BMI and their center of gravity and balance testing. However, Dzewaltowski doesn’t think the measurement is credible.

For personal goals, he said it is more important to focus on behaviors such as physical activity and fruit and vegetable consumption rather than the game’s BMI and fitness age measurements.

Dzewaltowski said it could be healthy for gamers to solely rely on Wii Fit for exercise if they are meeting the guidelines for physical activity set by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

He said future technologies should continue to promote physical activity if they make exercise enjoyable, especially for adults.

“I also believe that adults enjoy movement if they are at a fitness level where they can perform the activity comfortably,” Dzewaltowski said. “The problem is most adults have very poor fitness levels. So, I believe there is a future in developing games that include movement and demand caloric expenditure at the level of the participant.”

 

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