David Kirkpatrick

August 28, 2009

Web 2.0 and the taxman

Filed under: Business, Politics, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:35 pm

Don’t look now, but it seems state tax authorities are lurking social networking sites to track down tax deadbeats.

From the link:

Tax deadbeats are finding someone actually reads their MySpace and Facebook postings: the taxman.

State revenue agents have begun nabbing scofflaws by mining information posted on social-networking Web sites, from relocation announcements to professional profiles to financial boasts.

In Minnesota, authorities were able to levy back taxes on the wages of a long-sought tax evader after he announced on MySpace that he would be returning to his home town to work as a real-estate broker and gave his employer’s name. The state collected several thousand dollars, the full amount due.

Meanwhile, agents in Nebraska collected $2,000 from a deejay after he advertised on his MySpace page that he would be working at a big public party.

August 18, 2009

LinkedIn inks deal with SAP

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 4:11 pm

News from the world of corporate social networking.

From the link:

SAP has inked a deal with LinkedIn that will provide the software vendor’s channel partners with special tools and services for the popular business social-networking and careers site.The move is the first such agreement LinkedIn has formed with a software vendor, according to a statement. It is also the first instance of collaboration between the companies following an investment SAP’s venture capital arm made in LinkedIn last year.

The offer is available globally and is aimed at channel partners with up to 1,000 employees. It includes a special tool that helps partners find, track and contact appropriate candidates, as well as access to a job posting service on the site. SAP’s announcement indicates that partners will get a discount, but pricing information wasn’t immediately available Thursday.

Click here to find out more!Some 140,000 SAP consultants use LinkedIn, according to SAP.

You can find me at LinkedIn here: http://www.linkedin.com/in/davidkonline

August 7, 2009

Facebook, college kids and jealousy

Quite the combination …

The release:

Does Facebook usage contribute to jealousy in relationships?

New Rochelle, NY, August 6, 2009—The more time college students spend on Facebook, the more likely they are to feel jealous toward their romantic partners, leading to more time on Facebook searching for additional information that will further fuel their jealousy, in an escalating cycle that may become addictive, according to a study reported in CyberPsychology & Behavior, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. (www.liebertpub.com). The article is available free online at www.liebertpub.com/cpb

Amy Muise, MSc, Emily Christofides, MSc, and Serge Desmarais, PhD, from the University of Guelph (Ontario, Canada), surveyed young adults involved in romantic relationships and found that those who spent time on social networking sites such as Facebook may be exposed to information about their partners that makes them jealous, leading them to spend more time involved in online surveillance and to uncover even more jealousy-provoking information.

The Rapid Communication, entitled “More Information than You Ever Wanted: Does Facebook Bring Out the Green-Eyed Monster of Jealousy?” describes a vicious cycle in which Facebook usage and feelings of jealousy become intertwined and have a negative influence on behavior and relationships. Some participants in the study described their increasing use of Facebook as “addictive.” The authors recommend further research to explore this feedback loop and to determine whether a similar relationship between online social networking and jealousy toward a partner affects older adults as well.

“This research on university age individuals is an excellent starting point to begin asking additional questions on how this new forum might be impacting the dynamics of adult relationships and other social processes,” says Professor Dr. Brenda K. Wiederhold, Editor-in-Chief of CyberPsychology & Behavior.

 

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CyberPsychology & Behavior is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published bimonthly in print and online that explores the psychological and social issues surrounding the Internet and interactive technologies. A complete table of contents and free sample issue may be viewed online at www.liebertpub.com/cpb

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. (www.liebertpub.com), is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology and Alternative and Complementary Therapies. Its biotechnology trade magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), was the first in its field and is today the industry’s most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm’s 60 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available at www.liebertpub.com

August 6, 2009

Twitter hit with DoS attack

Filed under: Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 11:57 am

Web 2.0 social networking apps seem to be under fire today with Twitter hit with a denial-of-service attackand additional reports have both Facebook and LiveJournal experiencing problems.

Once again proving that axiom of the net — get popular and find a big target on your back, or servers as the case may be.

From the link:

Twitter, the popular micro-blogging service, was crippled Thursday morning by a denial-of-service attack.

The extended silence in a normally noisy Twitterworld began around 9 a.m., according to TechCrunch. Later, Twitter posted a note to its status update page saying the site had been slowed to a standstill by an attack.

In a denial-of-service attack, hackers typically direct a “botnet,” often made up of thousands of malware-infected home PCs, toward a target site in an effort to flood it with junk traffic. With the site overwhelmed, legitimate visitors cannot access the service.

“On this otherwise happy Thursday morning, Twitter is the target of a denial of service attack. Attacks such as this are malicious efforts orchestrated to disrupt and make unavailable services such as online banks, credit card payment gateways, and in this case, Twitter for intended customers or users,” co-founder Biz Stone said in a blog post. “We are defending against this attack now and will continue to update our status blog as we continue to defend and later investigate.”

July 16, 2009

Wal-Mart’s Twitter terms of service …

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:57 pm

… is as stupid as it is vague.

I’ll just let this bit from the link make my point:

As Michael Masnick of Techdirt points out, it’s hard to understand who these terms are directed at — employees of Wal-Mart who use Twitter, or customers who talk about Wal-Mart products on Twitter, or both. But the fact that Wal-Mart had its legal counsel construct a 3,000-plus word document entitled “Wal-Mart’s Twitter Terms of Use” means they want to be cautious for what liability they incur over the medium.

What on earth would make Wal-Mart think that it could expect the average Joe, say someone who Tweets about a Wal-Mart customer experience, to play by rules that the company itself lays out? We’re not sure

June 26, 2009

What comes after enterprise 2.0?

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 11:45 am

A CIO.com interview with Andrew McAfee, coiner of the term enterprise 2.0, on the next step in integrating web 2.0 into the enterprise.

From the link:

As people learned it was more efficient, for example, to put shared information into a wiki rather than e-mailing a Word document around to 50 people, the term Enterprise 2.0 was born. Coined by Andrew McAfee, an associate professor of technology and operations management at Harvard Business School, Enterprise 2.0 has yielded a whole industry of start-up and incumbent vendors that sell social software.

As that market meets this week for the annual Enterprise 2.0 conference in Boston, CIO.com’s C.G. Lynch caught up with McAfee, who recently authored a book on the topic. McAfee gives his take on how enterprises have done at adopting Web 2.0 technologies in the past year, and how the vendor landscape for selling social software to businesses has evolved.

June 25, 2009

Booz Allen Hamilton unveils roadmap to corporate web 2.0 success

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:47 pm

A lot of companies are spending a lot of time trying to sort out web 2.0 and web 3.0 and how social networking technology will fit into corporate culture, and improve business at the same time.

Looks like consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton may have stumbled into at least one working solution.

From the link:

If large companies are looking for evidence that a social networking strategy can work, Booz Allen Hamilton may have given them some.

BAH showcased its Hello application — in essence an enterprise version of Facebook — during a presentation at the Enterprise 2.0 conference in Boston Tuesday.

The portal, which incorporates blogs, wikis, podcasts, RSS feeds, personal profiles and other familiar social networking tools, was launched in August 2008.

Click here to find out more! While the technologies themselves may not be anything new, Hello’s rate of internal adoption suggests enterprise social networking can indeed become the pervasive force pundits and vendors have long proclaimed it will be.Since the launch, more than 40 percent of BAH’s roughly 20,000 workers have added content to Hello, and the portal contains about 350 subcommunities devoted to various topics, even though participation is voluntary, BAH senior associate Walton Smith said. “We’re excited we’re growing that fast and there’s no mandate.”

June 18, 2009

Technology and the Green Revolution

Filed under: Media, Politics, Technology — Tags: , , , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:29 pm

Technology is playing a huge role in the fight against the coup in Iran. Twitter has especially been a great boon to the Iranians fighting against a corrupt leadership. This is a story that is still very much playing out with no potential end result showing itself with clarity. One thing is certain — Iran 2009 will go down as the first true information age revolution in terms of technology driving getting information to both internal protesters and the outside world.

Here’s a breakdown from CIO.com on some of the relevant tech. Mentioned include Twitter, Facebook, proxies, DDOS, YouTube and Flickr.

From the link:

As political tensions increase in Iran, online communities are ramping up their opposition efforts. The Iranian government continues to restrict access to the Web, but many opposition supporters are still able to share news and information online. In response to the publicity around opposition protests, Iran has reportedly begun the process of restricting the movements of foreign journalists. But when any Iranian citizen carrying a cell phone or camera can become an instant journalist, how important is Iran’s crackdown on foreign media?

June 14, 2009

Tracking the coup in Iran

Filed under: Media, Politics, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 6:47 pm

The Daily Dish has been indispensible along with many, many other online resources. Twitter has apparently been indispensible among services in Iran.

As an app Twitter is still an infant battlling growing pains, hype and speculation on monetizing. What is amazing is how those 140 characters affected the San Diego wildfires and now an ongoing international situation where mainstream media is repeatedly dropping the ball. Web 2.0 is proving to be much more revolutionary than anyone could have guessed.

Hit the link for a Twitter search on the hashtag #iranelection.

June 12, 2009

Web 2.0 and security

Filed under: Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:16 pm

Here’s a group of four good security points from CIO.com to keep in mind when engaging in web 2.0/web 3.0/social networking.

Number four from the list:

4) Sadly, You Really Can’t Trust Your Friends or Your Social Network
As a tweet from the Websense Security Labs recently stated, “Web threats delivered via your personal Web 2.0 social network is the new black — do not automatically trust suspicious messages from friends.” The social networking explosion has created new ways of delivering threats. Web users are so accustomed to receiving tweets with shortened URLs, video links posted to their Facebook pages and email messages purportedly from the social networking sites themselves that most people don’t even hesitate to click on a link because they trust the sender.

The unfortunate reality is that criminals are taking advantage of that trust to disseminate malware and links to infected Web sites. Websense Security Labs recently found examples of e-mails sent from what appeared to be Facebook, but were really from criminals that encouraged users to click on a link to a “video” that was actually a page infected with malware.

June 11, 2009

Obama won on message and not web 2.0

Filed under: Politics, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 5:00 pm

For all the discussion on Obama’s campaign utilizing social media and how web 2.0 were game-changers in 2008, his social media director says Obama’s political message was the key component in his victory.

From the link:

Social media may be the flavor of the moment for corporate marketers but these tools won’t work for everyone, according to the man who led the social media component of Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign, saying it was Obama’s message — and not the medium — that carried the 2008 election.

“Message and messenger are key. This isn’t going to work for every organization or every start-up business if the message that you are selling isn’t resonating,” said Scott Goodstein, the CEO of Revolution Messaging and formerly the external online director at Obama for America, during a speech at the Ad:Tech Singapore conference on Wednesday.

Obama, who was elected president last year, used the Internet and social media — a broad term that encompasses social networking sites, blogs, video-sharing sites like YouTube, and message service Twitter — to spread his views on key topics and organize his supporters. But the candidate, not social media or the Internet, won the election, Goodstein said.

Click here to find out more! “It was an honor to work at the Obama campaign because at that point in American history we had the right candidate, the right message,” he said.

May 26, 2009

Social networking and the workplace

Research from Deloitte LLP Ethics & Workplace survey,

The release:

Deloitte study reveals tension regarding the use of social media in the workplace

According to the third annual Deloitte LLP Ethics & Workplace survey, 60 percent of business executives believe they have a right to know how employees portray themselves and their organizations in online social networks. However, employees disagree, as more than half (53 percent) say their social networking pages are not an employer’s concern. This fact is especially true among younger workers, with 63 percent of 18–34 year old respondents stating employers have no business monitoring their online activity

That said, employees appear to have a clear understanding of the risks involved in using online social networks, as 74 percent of respondents believe they make it easier to damage a company’s reputation.

“With the explosive growth of online social networks, such as Facebook and Twitter, rapidly blurring the lines between professional and private lives, these virtual communities have increased the potential of reputational risk for many organizations and their brands,” said Sharon Allen, chairman of the board, Deloitte LLP. “While the decision to post videos, pictures, thoughts, experiences, and observations is personal, a single act can create far-reaching ethical consequences for individuals as well as employers. Therefore, it is important for executives to be mindful of the implications of this connected world and to elevate the discussion about the risks associated with it to the highest levels of leadership.”

A mere 17 percent of executives surveyed say they have programs in place to monitor and mitigate the possible reputational risks related to the use of social networks. Additionally, while less than a quarter have formal policies on the medium’s use among their people, nearly half (49 percent) of employees indicate defined guidelines will not change their behavior online.

“One-third of employees surveyed never consider what their boss or customers might think before posting material online,” Allen continued. “This fact alone reinforces how vulnerable brands are as a result of the increased use of social networks. As business leaders, it is critical that we continue to foster solid values-based cultures that encourage employees to behave ethically regardless of the venue.”

The complete results of the 2009 Ethics & Workplace survey reflect opinions of employees and business executives on questions on ethics, work-life balance, reputational risk and the prevalence of boardroom participation as it relates to increased employee social networking.

Methodology
Opinion Research conducted a telephone survey on behalf of Deloitte LLP among a national probability sample of 2,008 employed adults comprising 1,000 men and 1,008 women 18 years of age and older, living in private households in the continental United States. Interviewing for these CARAVAN Surveys was completed during the period April 9–13 and 16–19, 2009. Sampling error is +/- 2.5 percent.

Opinion Research also conducted an online survey of 500 business executives. The sample for the study came from a panel of executives across the United States, including company owners, directors, CEOs, controllers, EVPs, CIOs, VPs, and board members. Invitations to participate in the study were sent beginning on April 10, 2009 and data collection continued through April 17, 2009.

About the Deloitte Chairman’s Survey
The Deloitte LLP Chairman’s survey is designed to measure workplace behavior and the impact leadership has on the workplace environment. Following up on last year’s survey, which uncovered a link between transparency of leadership and employee productivity, this year’s survey studied the impact of use of social networking on reputational risk, workplace ethics, and career-life fit. Sharon Allen, Chairman of the Board, Deloitte LLP, is the sponsor of the annual survey.

Social networking is not private

Filed under: Business, et.al., Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:54 pm

Not only is social networking not private, for the most part you are ceding some, or all, of the rights to material you post to social networking websites. Once your material is on their servers, you’ve essentially given it away. Something to think about.

From the link:

A study conducted by the University of Cambridge discovered that social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace do not immediately remove from its servers photos that have been deleted by users. The study audited 16 different social networking sites by uploading photos, noting their URLs, and then deleting them. Thirty days later researchers checked the URLs, and in the case of 7 sites, the photos had not been removed from content delivery networks.

The 7 sites are: Bebo, Facebook, hi5, LiveJournal, MySpace, SkyRock, and Xanga.

Other sites were able to remove pictures immediately, and surprisingly, frequent security offender Microsoft was one of them: Windows Live Spaces had immediate removal of photos. Also on the ball were Orkut, Photobucket, and Flickr.

May 13, 2009

Everything Twitter

Filed under: Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:10 pm

Well, not everything since I’ve done plenty of blogging about the microblogging/social networking application and website.

Here’s three offerings on Twitter from CIO.com — a comprehensive overview that is an excellent place to begin for every tweeting experience level, a great explanation of hashtags (using “#” in front of a key descriptor, such as #followfriday) in Twitter and a blog post blaming Twitter power users for running off the latest wave in new tweeters.

From the comprehensive overview:

Twitter Etiquette: Five Dos and Don’ts

Twitter beginners need to understand the rules of etiquette for the service. So before you stick a foot measuring 140-characters-or-less in your mouth, check out our advice on how to follow and un-follow, share politely, direct message appropriately, and more.

From the explanation of hashtags:

Twitter (the company) didn’t create hashtags. The Twitter community’s early adopters came up with the idea to put a “#” in front of topics to add context to tweets. The tag would also help filter and sort them out for future readers.

According to a Twitter fan website, the hashtags achieved significant notoriety with Twitter users in 2007 during the San Diego fires, when users designated their tweets with “#sandiegofires.”

The trend to use hashtags led to the community-driven site hashtags.org, where a semi-official index of Twitter’s hashtags now resides. To access the site, Twitter users merely need to opt-in (for free) by following @hashtags on Twitter.

And finally, from the blog post on ill mannered power users:

The rise of Twitter’s user-base has differed from Facebook, which grew upon a mainstream audience of college and high school kids looking to post photos and share the details of a Saturday night. While they were tech-savvy in the sense that they grew up with the Web, they weren’t “techy.” To them, the Web and technology just exists — and nothing more. 

Twitter has traveled a different road with its user base. Tech nerds and social media evangelists populated the service initially, followed by traditional media and public relations folks who wanted to track them. Soon, businesses and some over-aggressive marketers hopped in on the fun, before leading to famed celebrity accounts.

You can find on Twitter at http://twitter.com/davidkonline.

May 1, 2009

CDC flu prevention buttons

Anyone who wants a webstite button from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for various flu prevention measures can hit this link for a whole slew of ’em.

Just one example:

Wash your hands with soap and clean running water. Visit www.cdc.gov/h1n1 for more information.

(Hat tip: this tweet — whitehouse RT @CDC_eHealth Add a graphic with flu prevention messages to your webpage. Help spread the word about H1N1 (Swine Flu): http://is.gd/vXN6)

April 29, 2009

Post #2000

Filed under: et.al., Media — Tags: , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:14 am

Woot!

April 14, 2009

The government goes Twitter

Filed under: Media, Politics, Technology — Tags: , , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 4:46 pm

Twitter is the tech phenomena for 2009 so far. Now the federal government is getting into the act.

It’s a little amazing. The big question still is exactly where is Twitter heading? And will this exponential growth lead to even more fail whale sightings.

You can find me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/davidkonline.

From the link:

Twitter is taking flight in unlikely skies: the U.S. federal government.

From NASA to the General Services Administration, more federal agencies are embracing Twitter as another Web-based channel to communicate news and engage in conversations with U.S. citizens (10 Twitter tips from early federal adopters).

NASA announced Mondaythat astronaut Mike Massimino would use Twitter to provide a personal behind-the-scenes peek at his last few weeks of training before embarking on a space shuttle mission.  In the first 48 hours of Astro_Mike tweets, Massimino attracted more than 14,000 followers on Twitter.

Follow Network World editors and bloggers on Twitter 

Meanwhile, the Food and Drug Administration is notifying more than 3,200 consumers about recalls of peanut and pistachio products on its Twitter stream dubbed FDARecalls. FDA has been issuing four or five tweets a day announcing product recalls since December 2008.

Another leading advocate of Twitter is GSA, which manages government-wide IT contracts and provides training to federal Web managers on best practices for Web 2.0 technologies.

“We have done quite a bit with Twitter,” says B. Leilani Martinez, a bilingual content manager for the GSA’s Web site. “We have four official Twitter accounts for www.pueblo.gsa.gov, www.usa.gov, www.gobiernousa.gov, and www.govgab.gov. We blog one or two times a day….Twitter is just another channel that we are using to communicate.”

April 8, 2009

Twitter privacy failure?

Filed under: Media, Technology — Tags: , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:15 pm

Stories like this will do serious harm to the Twitter brand. Online privacy has been a long raging topic, but as more and more non-techies get into the web 2.0 world of social networking the issue will gain even more traction.

You can find me on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/davidkonline.

From the link:

Not long after Twitter launched, Stephanie Robesky of Atomico, the venture fund established by the former founders of Skype, registered @Skype while still at the company. But, she says in a blog post yesterday, she forgot about the move, only to be reminded of it after she realised a Twitter employee had handed out her name, email address and contact details to someone at Skype who then contacted her. In an open letter to Twitter yesterday, she blogged:

“This is a violation of my privacy and, quite honestly, probably a big violation of your privacy policies. It is unprofessional of your team to hand out users information regardless of circumstances and this is something that we never would have done at Skype – even if Obama himself couldn’t log in to an account that he says wasn’t even his! I hope that you and your team take privacy more seriously in the future.”

She told me on email: “I registered the Skype Twitter name because I worked at Skype at the time so thought it might have been of use to us at some point. I’m sure I told someone in marketing who ignored me and had no clue at the time what Twitter was. Left Skype last year and forgot that I even had registered the name until yesterday… Glad they don’t have my credit card details.”

(Hat tip: Twitter_Tips)

March 20, 2009

LinkedIn privacy tutorial

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:54 pm

If you use LinkedIn, this is a must read.

You can find me on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/davidkonline

From the link:

Since LinkedIn doesn’t require you to share the same types of personal information as you do on Facebook, the service’s privacy settings appear to be much more straightforward than its less business-oriented competitor. But if you leave the default settings in place, you might be surprised to know what information you make public on LinkedIn.

March 17, 2009

Microblogging for enterprise

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 5:17 pm

Here’s an article on microblogging platforms to bring the Twitter experience to internal corporate communications.

From the link:

Business technology leaders concerned with collaboration will be watching case studies like Davies’ closely. A November Forrester report by Oliver Young, an analyst who researches Enterprise 2.0 technologies, cast doubt on the viability of enterprise microblogging just yet.

The size of microblogging messages (generally 140 characters or less) could be an issue.

“Due to message size constraints, microblogs provide very limited contextual information, and thus have limited use in business environments,” the report noted. “Microblogs may become suitable for alerting, but less so for informing or gathering information.”

March 9, 2009

Web 2.0 government

Filed under: Politics, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 10:29 am

Looks like the nation’s first CIO is looking to make some needed changes around D.C. I particularly like the idea of a data.gov site with open format access to U.S. government information and documents. Bring the government of the people back to the people.

From the link:

The U.S. government’s first CIO, Vivek Kundra, introduced himself Thursday as someone who will act aggressively to change the federal government’s use of IT by adopting consumer technology and ensuring that government data is open and accessible.

Kundra also wants to use technology such as cloud computing to attack the government’s culture of big-contract boondoggles and its hiring of contractors who end up “on the payroll indefinitely.”

Kundra, in a conference call Thursday with reporters shortly after President Barack Obama named him as federal CIO said one of his first projects is to create a data.gov Web site to “democratize” the federal government’s vast information treasures by making them accessible in open formats and in feeds that can be used by application developers.

“How can we leverage the power of technology to make sure the country is moving in the right direction?” asked Kundra, stressing that his ambition is to “revolutionize technology in the public sector.”

Kundra was expansive about his tech goals and critical of the government’s contracting record for IT projects that “frankly haven’t performed well,” saying there have been few consequences for failures.

March 3, 2009

Using Twitter for job hunt

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:21 pm

Here’s a CIO.com article on using Twitter when searching for work. I think every tool in the box should be utilized when on the employment hunt and Twitter is certainly of the moment.

You can follow me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/davidkonline.

From the first link:

Though LinkedIn tops the list of professionally-oriented social networks for job seeking, you can also use Twitter to get the word out about your skills and talents to relevant people in your industry.

But you must take some steps to be a good Twitter citizen before you tweet yourself into your next gig. We spoke with some career and social media experts on how to utilize Twitter for the purpose of job seeking, and the ways in which you can promote your own interests while helping others at the same time. (As you’ll find, you can’t do one without the other).

If you’re new to Twitter, we recommend reading our beginners’ guide to Twitter, as well as our Twitter etiquette guide, to learn more about what makes this community operate. Overall, it’s important to remember that Twitter is about exchanging ideas and letting people know more about you based on the content of your tweets.

February 20, 2009

Blogging and small business

Filed under: Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:24 pm

Blogging, Twitter and other Web 2.0 tools can be a real boon for small business, but it’s important to have a solid plan and stay with the plan. Unless a small business owner has a lot of time to devote to social media, or has staff in place that can fill the role hiring a professional writer to ghost blog is not a bad idea.

The business owner can stay on top of the subject matter covered and frequency of blogging while the ghost blogger can focus on solid, SEO content posts and stay of abreast of the rapidly changing Web 2.0 world.

From the MainStreet.com link:

Blogs have blown up. So how does blogging fit into your marketing strategy?

First, the eye-popping statistics. There is a total Internet audience of 188.9 million worldwide for blogs, according to comScore, and eMarketer says half of all readers are in the U.S. By the end of 2009, there will be 28 million bloggers in America and 116 million readers, eMarketer projects.

Some demographics: Readers of blogs have household income of $75,000, meaning upper-middle class, according to Technorati. Half of all bloggers are on their second blog, and 59% have been posting for at least two years. In addition, two-thirds are male; half are 18 to 34 years old; 74% have college degrees; and 44% are parents.

One interesting stat that caught my eye: Fewer than 1% of readers have incomes in excess of $150,000, which tells me the following: Decision leaders aren’t typically reading blogs, and the very wealthy are not reading blogs

February 19, 2009

Six Twitter tips

Filed under: Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 12:59 pm

Twitter is suddenly everywhere. Here’s six more tips on maximizing your tweets.

You can find me on Twitter at @davidkonline.

From the link:

Twitter is vapid, Twitter is narcissistic—Twitter is actually terribly useful if you can ignore knee-jerk backlash. The casual, instant nature of the service lends itself to solving small problems quickly, distributing live-on-the-scene news reports, and keeping track of people. Here are six easy ways to transform Twitter from a time sink into an indispensable tool.

February 18, 2009

Facebook on the brink?

Filed under: Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 11:59 am

The flap over user content may be the tipping point for Facebook. MySpace had a similar problem, but no one really cared because it mostly hit gloomy kid’s bad poetry and indie band MP3s. Facebook is a player in the adult world — I get hit up once or twice a week to start a Facebook page — so these allegations carry a little more weight.

From the link:

Have Social Media/Web 2.0 Companies Gone Too Far To Obtain & Own Data?

Absolutely.  Here’s why – The data they collect is what is fueling and stabilizing their ridiculous valuations and the funding coming in which they rely on to survive due to their minimal revenue streams.  It’s this data “gold” that companies and VC’s DEPEND on and are in fact inesting in.  It’s not the UI, or the ability to poke a friend.  The maximum protection or “assurance” the Investment bankers, VC’s and Angels are investing in is the data & who owns it.

It’s that simple – Nothing else to it.

Conclusion:

Joining the groups emerging on Facebook isn’t going to change a thing, just as it didn’t when they changed the UI and everyone was in an uproar.  Zuck and the legal team are making moves to protect valuation.  In the grand scheme of the things 50 thousand or 1M peope joining a group won’t make a difference.  This I believe, will be the tipping point to create attrition to the already hairline cracks emerging in the Facebook empire.  They simply refuse to listen to their customers. We saw this with Beacon, their development requirements, the new UI and now the new TOS.  The valuation has dropped from a reported $15B to $4B in less than a year and this recent stunt may see more defection in their user base.  Although they own the content after a user leaves, if 20 or 30 Million strong decide the terms aren’t for them the cards will collapse on the empire and quickly.

February 17, 2009

Twitter in the OR

Filed under: Media, Science, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 12:08 pm

Is there anywhere Twitter hasn’t invaded these days? The last ten days or so may be the time when Twitter reaches critical mass.

Find me on Twitter at @davidkonline.

From the link:

t’s potentially a risky surgery, but everything’s ready: The doctors and nurses are in the operating room, the surgical instruments are sterilized and ready to go, and the chief resident is furiously Twittering on his laptop.

That’s right — last week, for the second known time, surgeons Twittered a surgery by using social-networking site Twitter to give short real-time updates about the procedure

(Hat tip: copyblogger)

October 14, 2008

Bad intranet? Web 2.0 to the rescue! Maybe

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 12:04 pm

This CIO.com looks at the prospects of Web 2.0 applications making a bad corporate intranet good, or maybe even great. One key conclusion is just putting those apps out there for use isn’t good enough. They need to be correctly implemented and utilized.

From the link:

But it’s clear some hurdles remain. While building a useful corporate intranet starts with  wiki technology and other social software, all these IT leaders were emphatic in their interviews with CIO that just buying social software and Web 2.0 won’t necessarily translate into success. They say you must be very adept at feeding information in there automatically rather than waiting for users to do it themselves.

As Jason Harrison, the CIO of the global communications firm, Universal McCann told me about his successful implemenation of social networking sites using SharePoint, merely copying Facebook won’t do the job.
“We needed something self-perpetuating that fed relevant [corporate] information in,” Harrison says. “We weren’t going to try to recreate Facebook internally.”

As a result, he said social software and Web 2.0 technologies must integrate with exisiting systems to give you a baseline of useful information. You don’t only want to feed in basic biographical information about employees like their contact info; you also need relevant documents and pieces of content to give the intranet some life and give employees something to discuss.

October 3, 2008

Corporate wikis

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 9:36 am

Looks like one of the secrets to a successful corporate intranet is a wiki with a simple user interface.

From the link:

When Matthew Schultz started at iCrossing in February, a digital marketing firm, he realized his company had a knowledge management challenge. As the company expanded through acquisition, there wasn’t a fundamental method or technology to harness institutional knowledge.

“We’re adding not only products, but we were growing in people and the knowledge they bring,” says Schultz, the company’s VP of technology. “We needed a way to put all this knowledge in one location.”

The existing corporate intranet was typical: a phone directory, a few uploaded corporate documents, and no way to update it without getting help from the IT department, which was consumed with running critical corporate applications.

“IT wants to help, but they can only do so much,” Schultz says. “We needed something that was not only for the employees, but by the employees. I wanted us to build a wikipedia for the company and I wanted to make it the reference point for iCrossing’s knowledge.”

He needed to buy a wiki, a technology that allows users to update web pages often with no programming experience or knowledge of HTML code. He chose Socialtext, the Palo Alto company that made its mark selling wikis to enterprises and has since added corporate social networking profiles and a microblogging tool (a Twitter for the enterprise) to its portfolio.

October 1, 2008

The trouble with technology contracts

Filed under: Business, et.al., Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 12:41 pm

According to this CIO.com article, technology contracts are time-bombs waiting to go off in the face of those who think their interests are being protected.

From the link:

In the past, legal documents, whether private placement, merger and acquisition, or documenting a large commercial transaction, used a time-tested formula established by quality lawyers. The deal process was a sophisticated one, done using a mature contracting process. The lawyers involved even understood what it was they were doing.

The problem these days largely surrounds tech and telecom contracting. Usually, the first draft of the contract comes from the seller of the services. It might be services like managed network services, the development and maintenance of a website with Web 2.0 features, or for the customization of some software. While in many ways the Web 2.0 world is more sophisticated than the go-go dotcom 1990s, more often than not these deals still show the wisdom of the 20-minute-old dotcom driving the deal. (All that’s missing are pimples on the documents.)

However, don’t think this arises only when doing deals with smaller or startup companies. I once did a deal with IBM and I smiled when I read the master agreement because it was a well-written document crafted by some major New York law firm. It had the pro-IBM bias that I expected, but it’s simple to negotiate it back toward the middle (as your vendor is kicking and complaining—and lying—that you’re the most difficult customer they’ve ever had).

August 20, 2008

The dumb side of Web 2.0

Filed under: Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:04 pm

Not all Web 2.0 sites out there are useful. Some it could be argued are nothing more than solutions looking for non-existent problems.

CIO.com served up the 14 most ridiculous sites they could find:

Alas, not every Web 2.0 site is a winner. Many are vague, pointless, or just plain silly. As Web critic Nicholas Carr notes, “If I were called in to rename Web 2.0, I think I’d call it Gilligan’s Web,” after the goofy ’60s sitcom.

How do you identify a dumb Web 2.0 site? First, the site’s mission statement must be impenetrable. (“Spotback is a personalized rating system that recommends relevant content based on personal rating history using collaborative filtering and aggregated knowledge technologies.” Huh?) Second, the site must solve a problem that has been solved a million times already or didn’t need solving in the first place. Third, its name must love the letter “r” but eschew vowels ( Drivl, Grazr, Hngry), or be a refugee from “Jabberwocky” ( CurdBee, Egghub, Humyo, Jiffle).

Here are 14 of the silliest and most redundant, tasteless, or mystifying Web 2.0 sites. Warning: Visiting these sites may impair higher brain functions.

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