David Kirkpatrick

April 18, 2010

The latest on the SculptCAD Rapid Artist Project

Here’s the official announcement of the project:

SculptCAD Rapid Artists to Debut at Society of Manufacturing Engineers Rapid 2010 Conference and Exposition

Inaugural Sculpture Exhibit Will Showcase the Convergence of Art and Technology

DALLAS, TX–(Marketwire – April 12, 2010) –  SculptCAD Rapid Artists, an experimental project launched by SculptCAD, a provider of sculptural/CAD design and reverse engineering services, announced its upcoming debut at the 2010 Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) RAPID Conference and Exposition (SME RAPID 2010), to be held on May 18-20 at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim, California. For the first time ever, SME RAPID 2010 will host an exhibit dedicated to the convergence of art and technology. Titled “Art’s Newest Medium: Rapid Prototyping Applied to Contemporary Visions of Sculpture,” the exhibit will feature the works of 15 SculptCAD Rapid Artists members who are exploring the use SculptCAD digital 3D modeling software to create art.

“This inaugural exhibit marks the first time that the SME RAPID Conference and Exposition has been open to fine art,” said Nancy Hairston, Founder and President of VanDuzen Inc. — the parent company of SculptCAD, and a SculptCAD Rapid Artists sculptor. “I applaud the vision of the SME RAPID 2010 conference leaders in welcoming SculptCAD Rapid Artists and its ground-breaking approach to art in the 21st Century.”

“SME is always on the lookout for cutting-edge, rapid manufacturing applications to enhance the value of our program,” said Gary Mikola, SME show manager. “SculptCAD Rapid Artists is a perfect fit. We’ve received strong interest from registered attendees and participants, and as a result we’re also offering technical sessions that support the visual Contemporary Art Gallery.”

Launched in October 2009, SculptCAD Rapid Artists’ mission is to expose career fine artists, previously unfamiliar with digital techniques, to 3D software, 3D scanners, and Rapid Prototype (RP) output. Members of SculptCAD Rapid Artists include sculptors, painters, and installation artists who work in materials ranging from marble to rubber to wood. Using computer technology to fuel the creative process, SculptCAD Rapid Artists is challenging conventional perceptions of art in the physical realm.

Digital sculptures created by SculptCAD Rapid Artists members benefit the Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts (Arts Magnet) in Dallas. Many of the participating artists are alumni of Arts Magnet. All exemplify an innovative spirit consistent with the contemporary vision of the extraordinary Dallas Arts District.

At SME RAPID 2010, Nancy Hairston will give a Fine Arts track presentation titled, “Rapid Artists – Experiment in Artists Immersed in Rapid Technologies for the First Time.” Scheduled on May 19 at 10:00 a.m., Nancy’s presentation will report on the potential that SculptCAD Rapid Artists is unleashing.

About SculptCAD Rapid Artists
SculptCAD Rapid Artists is an experimental project launched by SculptCAD, a leading provider of sculptural/CAD design and reverse engineering services. Dedicated to the creation of fine art, SculptCAD Rapid Artists’ mission is to explore and expand the use of computer technology to design and produce works of sculpture utilizing 3D software, 3D scanning, and 3D printing. Artists can create having freedom from the constraints of physical media, and can make art faster using digital tools. Digital also offers artists the ability to make multiple versions and editions of their work, print art on-demand, and enable collectors to purchase and download art online. SculptCAD Rapid Artists was founded in October 2009 and is based in Dallas, Texas. For more information about how SculptCAD Rapid Artists is changing perceptions of art in the physical world, visit http://www.sculptcadrapidartists.com.

About SculptCAD
SculptCAD specializes in time compression technologies for 3D design and manufacturing. These technologies include reverse engineering, 3D visualization, 3D modeling, rapid prototyping, rapid manufacturing, digital sculpting and CAD surfacing. SculptCAD serves a number of industries including fine art, housewares, medical, aerospace, packaging, product and toy manufacturing, and inspection. SculptCAD is a division of VanDuzen Inc., a rapid digital solutions company. Based in Dallas, Texas, VanDuzen is the parent company of two other divisions: MedCAD andVouch Software.

About Nancy Hairston
President & CEO, VanDuzen Inc.
Ms. Hairston brings 17 years of experience as a traditional sculptor and digital technologist to the pursuit of integrating 3D technologies in the creation and manufacture of sculptural products. Receiving a BA in Sculpture from Loyola University in New Orleans, Ms. Hairston began a career in 3D modeling with Alias | Wavefront / Silicon Graphics , in 2000, Ms. Hairston joined SensAble Technologies, and was instrumental in designing and implementing the “rapid” digital product development process between the United States and Asia for major American manufacturers. She founded VanDuzen Inc. in 2002, whose divisions – SculptCAD and MedCAD – work with major manufacturers to develop a variety of products, from toys to housewares to medical devices using Rapid technologies. In 2009, VanDuzen Inc. developed Vouch Software, which detects safety hazards in children’s products. VanDuzen Inc. is based in Dallas, Texas.

About The Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME)
Founded in 1932, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (www.sme.org) is the premier source for manufacturing knowledge, education and networking. Through its many programs, events and activities, SME connects manufacturing practitioners to each other, to the latest technology and the most up-to-date processes spanning all manufacturing industries and disciplines, plus the key areas of aerospace and defense, medical device, motor vehicles, including motorsports, oil and gas and alternative energy. A 501(c)3 organization, SME has members around the world and is supported by a network of technical communities and chapters worldwide.

Hit this link for all posts on the SculptCAD Rapid Artists Project.

February 10, 2010

The SculptCAD Rapid Artists Project

Received mail from Nancy Hairston recently about a very exciting project combining fine art with 3D modeling, rapid prototyping and digital sculpture. Nancy is the founder and president of VanDuzen Inc., parent company of MedCAD, SculptCAD and Vouch Software, and even though she’s currently a leader in the 3D modeling and prototyping world, her background is in the arts.

She regularly presents at the SME Rapid show each year — a couple of years ago even discussing a VanDuzen project involving fine art when uncovering a forged Picasso sculpture — and this year was approached about giving working artists the opportunity to play around with the cutting edge of 3D digital technology and see what resulted. Nancy jumped at the opportunity and out of the initial conversation grew the SculptCAD Rapid Artists Project. Nancy has assembled 14 artists, including herself, and the resulting artwork will be shown in conjunction with the SME Rapid show coming this May in Anaheim.

From the final link:

SculptCAD, a front runner in blending sculpture and CAD for manufacturing and reverse engineering, is inviting artists to hang a left from the utilitarian use of this technology and do what they do when they do art. “Wouldn’t it be interesting to see what these artists would come up with, if they had access to 3D tools.” mused Nancy Hairston, Founder of SculptCAD. An idea was born : SculptCAD Rapid Artists Project.

The experience is apt to be transformative, expanding the creative process and arousing a shift in thinking about how art comes to take it’s place in the physical realm. A very, very contemporary approach to art. Why “Rapid”? Rapid Prototype Printing, 3D Scanning and Digital Sculpture. New approaches to art making and art output. High speed. On Demand. It allows the impossible to be possible. The SculptCAD Rapid Artists will show the possibilities they discover.

And here’s a list of participating artists:

RAPID ARTISTS

Expect much more on this project here in the coming months.

September 22, 2008

VanDuzen Archives in the blogs

I always love seeing my clients in the media, be it mainstream, trade or even blogs. This past weekend VanDuzen Archives, the fine art division of VanDuzen Inc., a 3D visualization and modeling company was mentioned in a post at Appraiser Workshops blog.

The post was based on an article in Design News from last month. I blogged about that story here.

From the first link:

In my article “Art Bronze” that was published in the “Journal of Advanced Appraisal Studies” I stated that the only sure method for determining the authenticity of a bronze cast is complete documentation of its ownership, which includes the custody of the materials since their creation, including any changes or restorations that successive custodians have made to them. While that is still true, we now have 3-D imaging hardware and software which has become an important tool in fighting the war against art fraud.

One company, “The VanDuzen Archives of Dallas, has built a growing business around the use of imaging hardware and digital shape sampling software as tools to authenticate and conserve works of art.

August 8, 2008

High tech art fraud detection

Filed under: Arts, Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:19 pm

VanDuzen Archives, the fine art division of VanDuzen Inc., was featured in a Design News story today. Full disclosure — I provide communications consulting for all three divisions of VanDuzen Inc.: VanDuzen Archives, SculptCAD and MedCAD. VanDuzen is a Dallas-based 3D visualization and modeling company operating in a number of industries.

From the link:

The VanDuzen Archives of Dallas has built a growing business around the use of imaging hardware and digital shape sampling software as tools to authenticate and conserve works of art. And in one recent job, the company helped ferret out a forged copy of Picasso’s Tete de Fernande, a bronze bust.

Speaking at the SME’s Rapid 2008 conference, VanDuzen president and CEO Nancy Hairston recounted how a major New York auction house, which she wouldn’t name because of confidentiality agreements, had become suspicious of a Tete de Fernande bust that one of its client wanted to put up for auction. The bust had supposedly been cast, in the 1920’s, from Picasso’s original plaster molds.

Art experts seeking to authenticate a casting such as this usually take a series of linear measurements using calipers and then compare the measurements to authenticated versions of the same casting. Size deviations bigger than shrink values for the cast material are one indication that a piece is just not right.

In the case of the bust, initial linear measurements showed it to be 15 percent smaller than three authenticated castings–including ones at the Tate Gallery in London and the MOMA in New York. “Bronze shrinks approximately 10 percent from the plaster molds, so that wasn’t a possible shrink value,” Hairston says.

To be sure, though, the auction house turned to VanDuzen, which took a high tech approach to measuring the sculptures. The company first digitized the suspect bronze as well as three authenticated versions of the Tete de Fernande using a portable Konica Minolta VIVID 9i non-contact digitizer. Hairston recalls that it took about 150 scans and six hours to digitize each piece.

The scan data was then analyzed using using digital shape sampling and processing (DSSP) software from Geomagic. The software let VanDuzen perform deviation studies that would be difficult or impossible to do accurately with linear measurements. One study that compared the total volume of the suspect bust with those of authenticated pieces. And another, a registration study, showed how well the busts line up with one another.

And it turns out they didn’t line up at all. Hairston says the registration study revealed that the suspect bust was off kilter due to the addition of excess material on its base. “Forger added material to the base to throw off liner measurements,” she says. Once that excess material was digitally trimmed, the suspect bust turned out to be 20 percent smaller than the authenticated models. “That’s what sunk the piece,” she says.