David Kirkpatrick

September 22, 2008

VanDuzen Archives in the blogs

I always love seeing my clients in the media, be it mainstream, trade or even blogs. This past weekend VanDuzen Archives, the fine art division of VanDuzen Inc., a 3D visualization and modeling company was mentioned in a post at Appraiser Workshops blog.

The post was based on an article in Design News from last month. I blogged about that story here.

From the first link:

In my article “Art Bronze” that was published in the “Journal of Advanced Appraisal Studies” I stated that the only sure method for determining the authenticity of a bronze cast is complete documentation of its ownership, which includes the custody of the materials since their creation, including any changes or restorations that successive custodians have made to them. While that is still true, we now have 3-D imaging hardware and software which has become an important tool in fighting the war against art fraud.

One company, “The VanDuzen Archives of Dallas, has built a growing business around the use of imaging hardware and digital shape sampling software as tools to authenticate and conserve works of art.

August 8, 2008

High tech art fraud detection

Filed under: Arts, Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:19 pm

VanDuzen Archives, the fine art division of VanDuzen Inc., was featured in a Design News story today. Full disclosure — I provide communications consulting for all three divisions of VanDuzen Inc.: VanDuzen Archives, SculptCAD and MedCAD. VanDuzen is a Dallas-based 3D visualization and modeling company operating in a number of industries.

From the link:

The VanDuzen Archives of Dallas has built a growing business around the use of imaging hardware and digital shape sampling software as tools to authenticate and conserve works of art. And in one recent job, the company helped ferret out a forged copy of Picasso’s Tete de Fernande, a bronze bust.

Speaking at the SME’s Rapid 2008 conference, VanDuzen president and CEO Nancy Hairston recounted how a major New York auction house, which she wouldn’t name because of confidentiality agreements, had become suspicious of a Tete de Fernande bust that one of its client wanted to put up for auction. The bust had supposedly been cast, in the 1920’s, from Picasso’s original plaster molds.

Art experts seeking to authenticate a casting such as this usually take a series of linear measurements using calipers and then compare the measurements to authenticated versions of the same casting. Size deviations bigger than shrink values for the cast material are one indication that a piece is just not right.

In the case of the bust, initial linear measurements showed it to be 15 percent smaller than three authenticated castings–including ones at the Tate Gallery in London and the MOMA in New York. “Bronze shrinks approximately 10 percent from the plaster molds, so that wasn’t a possible shrink value,” Hairston says.

To be sure, though, the auction house turned to VanDuzen, which took a high tech approach to measuring the sculptures. The company first digitized the suspect bronze as well as three authenticated versions of the Tete de Fernande using a portable Konica Minolta VIVID 9i non-contact digitizer. Hairston recalls that it took about 150 scans and six hours to digitize each piece.

The scan data was then analyzed using using digital shape sampling and processing (DSSP) software from Geomagic. The software let VanDuzen perform deviation studies that would be difficult or impossible to do accurately with linear measurements. One study that compared the total volume of the suspect bust with those of authenticated pieces. And another, a registration study, showed how well the busts line up with one another.

And it turns out they didn’t line up at all. Hairston says the registration study revealed that the suspect bust was off kilter due to the addition of excess material on its base. “Forger added material to the base to throw off liner measurements,” she says. Once that excess material was digitally trimmed, the suspect bust turned out to be 20 percent smaller than the authenticated models. “That’s what sunk the piece,” she says.