David Kirkpatrick

January 23, 2010

Why there can be no real debate on abortion

Well, there’s a multitude of reasons, but this quote from the recent March for Life makes a pretty strong point:

One Virginia woman I spoke with, Rosemary, held up a massive image of Jesus while echoing Mother Teresa to me. Repeating her claim that abortion is the world’s greatest problem, she said: “It’s the contraception mentality…contraception leads to abortion leads to nuclear war.” She told me that, if she had her way, contraception would be illegal. “It’s bad for women. Life is being sabotaged.”

Abortion is the world’s greatest problem? The exact opposite — overcrowding — is certainly much more of a an actual problem when compared to a quasi-moral posit. And exactly how does abortion lead to nuclear war? That’s quite the chain of logic at work there.

Then there’s this from the March for Life founder:

“No exceptions. No compromise.”

So blared from the lips of Nellie Gray, the founder of the annual March for Life event, which brings hundreds of thousands of pro-life advocates to the mall at Washington, D.C. every year on the anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision. “We can’t compromise with the abortionists,” she said — by which she means the Democratic Party and, as she came to explain, anyone who believes in exceptions for rape.

The phrase “no compromise” by definition means debating the issue is pointless.

May 31, 2009

Tragedy in the culture wars

Filed under: Politics — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 1:39 pm

Maybe I should have titled this one, “Theocrat uses church for murder.” Of course that would be misleading because we don’t the philosophy of this particular murderer. We do know the philosophy of many public figures who speak of abortion and abortion-performing doctors in militant terms.

Dr. George Tiller’s blood is on the hands of many. Hopefully the one who pulled the trigger is caught and fully punished. I’m going out on a limb and guessing eventually we’ll find out he “did it for god.”

From the link:

George Tiller, a Wichita doctor who was one of the few doctors in the nation to perform late-term abortions, was shot to death on Sunday as he attended church, city officials in Wichita said.

Dr. Tiller, who had performed abortions since the 1970s, had long been a lightning rod for controversy over the issue of abortion, particularly in Kansas, where abortion opponents regularly protested outside his clinic and sometimes his home and church. In 1993, he was shot in both arms by an abortion opponent but recovered.

He had also been the subject of many efforts at prosecution, including a citizen-initiated grand jury investigation. In the latest such effort, in March, Dr. Tiller was acquitted of charges that he had performed late-term abortions that violated state law.

The shooting occurred at around 10 a.m. (Central time) at Reformation Lutheran Church on the city’s East Side, Dr. Tiller’s regular church.

Update: You can follow the real time reactions at Twittervia the #tiller hashtag. There’s news and condolences, but then there’s a lot of great, and sickening, examples of the mindset of christianists and theocrats. Truly sick people and enemies of the United States. Religious terrorism anyone?

The perpetrator of this murder and all who encouraged this act explicitly or implicitly are nothing more than domestic terrorists. Looks like the battle against religious terrorism has a renewed front and a slightly different flavor in terms of the “good book” used to justify the terrorist acts.

Take any opinion on abortion and abortionists you like, but Dr. Tiller was a certified medical doctor practicing medicine the United States and performing legal medical procedures. He died for simply doing his job and providing a legal service (late-term abortions) few other doctors dare offer, often because of fear of being murdered. That is the definition of terrorism.

March 10, 2009

We can only pray …

Filed under: et.al., Politics — Tags: , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 11:31 am

… for such an outcome.

We are on the verge – within 10 years – of a major collapse of evangelical Christianity. This breakdown will follow the deterioration of the mainline Protestant world and it will fundamentally alter the religious and cultural environment in the West.

Within two generations, evangelicalism will be a house deserted of half its occupants. (Between 25 and 35 percent of Americans today are Evangelicals.) In the “Protestant” 20th century, Evangelicals flourished. But they will soon be living in a very secular and religiously antagonistic 21st century.

This collapse will herald the arrival of an anti-Christian chapter of the post-Christian West. Intolerance of Christianity will rise to levels many of us have not believed possible in our lifetimes, and public policy will become hostile toward evangelical Christianity, seeing it as the opponent of the common good.

Millions of Evangelicals will quit. Thousands of ministries will end. Christian media will be reduced, if not eliminated. Many Christian schools will go into rapid decline. I’m convinced the grace and mission of God will reach to the ends of the earth. But the end of evangelicalism as we know it is close.

November 25, 2008

James Dobson another executioner of the GOP

James Dobson, theocrat and Focus on Family leader, excoriates Kathleen Parker for the heresy of saying the GOP has a religious right problem. According to the king-unmaker she’s no longer a conservative.

I’d say Dobson is much more a cancer on conservatism and the GOP brand than anything Parker has written this electoral season. What a nutbag.

From the link:

Washington Post columnist says the Republican Party must ditch God in order to survive.

So, Kathleen Parker has determined that getting rid of social conservatives and shelving the values they fight for is the solution to what ails the Republican Party (“Giving Up on God,” Nov. 19). Isn’t that a little like Benedict Arnold handing George Washington a battle plan to win the Revolution?

Whatever she once was, Ms. Parker is certainly not a conservative anymore, having apparently realized it’s a lot easier to be popular among your journalistic peers when your keyboard tilts to the left. She writes that “armband religion” — those of us who “wear our faith on our sleeve,” I suppose, or is it meant to compare socially conservative Christians to Nazis? — is “killing the Republican Party.” Lest readers miss the point, she literally spells it out. The GOP’s big problem? G-O-D. N-O-N-S-E-N-S-E.

Update — Dobson does make one point I totally agree with.

Also from the link:

Good thing, then, we don’t need an embossed note from Ms. Parker — or anyone else — to take part in the political dialogue — of either party. Our invitation to engage the process comes straight from our Founders. We will continue to stand up for the sanctity of human life, the sacredness of marriage and the right to have a say in the principles that will continue to guide this nation founded on biblical  principles. Where Ms. Parker gets it most wrong is in writing that socially conservative Christians are an “element that used to be relegated to wooden crates on street corners.”

The first amendment absolutely gives him and everyone the right to free speech. I think Parker’s point was if the GOP wants to continue winning elections (particularly nationally) Dobson and his ilk need to be confined to wooden crates on street corners.

September 18, 2008

Denied Communion for Endorsing Obama

Filed under: et.al., Politics — Tags: , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:30 am

Ridiculous.

The christianist right wing is out of control.

From the link:

Doug Kmiec is a conservative Reagan administration official and leading pro-life legal scholar. Despite his strong anti-abortion views, he recently endorsed Barack Obama on the grounds that Obama cared more about the full range of “life” issues – including poverty and human rights – and because Kmiec believes that Obama’s “abortion reduction” agenda will have more impact on abortion in the short run than the traditional battles against Roe v. Wade.He was attacked by conservative Catholics and Republicans and was even denied communion from his church, a moment he describes here in an excerpt from his new book, Can a Catholic Support Him?:


September 6, 2008

Noonan’s advice to Palin

Filed under: Politics — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 12:44 pm

I wanted to break this into two posts (see the first here) because Noonan was writing pretty raw several days ago, but the first impressions of a someone are always relevant. Peggy Noonan is certainly a someone.

Peggy giving some words of wisdom to Palin:

Final point. Palin’s friends should be less immediately worried about what the Obama campaign will do to her than what the McCain campaign will do. This is a woman who’s tough enough to work her way up and through, and to say yes to a historic opportunity, but she will know little of, or rather have little experience in, the mischief inherent in national Republican politics. She will be mobbed up in the McCain campaign by people who care first about McCain and second about themselves. (Or, let’s be honest, often themselves first and then McCain.) Palin will never be higher than number three in their daily considerations. They won’t have enough interest in protecting her, advancing her, helping her play to her strengths, helping her kick away from danger. And – there is no nice way to say this, even though at this point I shouldn’t worry about nice – some of them are that worst sort of aide, dim and insensitive past or present lobbyists with high self-confidence. She’ll be a thing to them; they’ll see the smile and the chignon and the glasses and think she’s Truvi from Steel Magnolias. They’ll run right over her, not because they’re strong but because they’re stupid. The McCain campaign better get straight on this. He should step in, knock heads, scare his own people and get Palin the help and high-level staff all but the most seasoned vice presidential candidates require.