David Kirkpatrick

November 3, 2010

A 3D printed car?

Filed under: Business, et.al., Science, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 11:57 pm

Yes.

From the link:

The Urbee — an electric/liquid-fuel hybrid that will get the equivalent of over 200 mpg on the highway and 100 MPG in the city — is the first prototype car ever to have its entire body 3D printed, according to a Stratasys press release.

All exterior components — including the glass panel prototypes — were created using Dimension 3D Printers and Fortus 3D Production Systems, using fused deposition modeling (FDM), an additive rapid prototyping process in which a plastic filament is liquefied and extruded to form layers of a model.

 

February 10, 2010

The SculptCAD Rapid Artists Project

Received mail from Nancy Hairston recently about a very exciting project combining fine art with 3D modeling, rapid prototyping and digital sculpture. Nancy is the founder and president of VanDuzen Inc., parent company of MedCAD, SculptCAD and Vouch Software, and even though she’s currently a leader in the 3D modeling and prototyping world, her background is in the arts.

She regularly presents at the SME Rapid show each year — a couple of years ago even discussing a VanDuzen project involving fine art when uncovering a forged Picasso sculpture — and this year was approached about giving working artists the opportunity to play around with the cutting edge of 3D digital technology and see what resulted. Nancy jumped at the opportunity and out of the initial conversation grew the SculptCAD Rapid Artists Project. Nancy has assembled 14 artists, including herself, and the resulting artwork will be shown in conjunction with the SME Rapid show coming this May in Anaheim.

From the final link:

SculptCAD, a front runner in blending sculpture and CAD for manufacturing and reverse engineering, is inviting artists to hang a left from the utilitarian use of this technology and do what they do when they do art. “Wouldn’t it be interesting to see what these artists would come up with, if they had access to 3D tools.” mused Nancy Hairston, Founder of SculptCAD. An idea was born : SculptCAD Rapid Artists Project.

The experience is apt to be transformative, expanding the creative process and arousing a shift in thinking about how art comes to take it’s place in the physical realm. A very, very contemporary approach to art. Why “Rapid”? Rapid Prototype Printing, 3D Scanning and Digital Sculpture. New approaches to art making and art output. High speed. On Demand. It allows the impossible to be possible. The SculptCAD Rapid Artists will show the possibilities they discover.

And here’s a list of participating artists:

RAPID ARTISTS

Expect much more on this project here in the coming months.

July 31, 2008

The Kinko’s of 3D printing

Filed under: Science, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 12:32 am

A company I provide communications consulting for is in the 3D visualization and modeling space. The modeling involves “printing” a 3D image in polymers. A very cool and very expensive process. I’ve held a printed hand that exactly matched the original scan — size, fingerprints, everything. But, instead of soft flesh it was a rigid piece of white plastic.

This Technology Review story covers a new online service providing access to 3D rapid prototyping for anyone with a 3D modeled item in ready data form. A real breakthrough in putting cutting-edge technology in the hands of the masses.

One application of rapid prototyping 3D data is “mass customization” — gaining the benefits of mass production for customized items. And it significantly speeds up the development process.

From the link:

Currently, such 3-D printers–in which successive layers of different polymers are sprayed gradually, building up a 3-D object–are very expensive, says Peter Weijmarshausen, CEO of Shapeways, a spinout from Philips Research, in Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

But the new service, launched last week, makes this technology accessible to anyone: budding artists, architects, product designers, and general hobbyists. A small design company might want to make samples to show a client, or an artist might want to make copies of the same sculpture created digitally, for example.

“From a technology viewpoint, Shapeways is not that new,” says Weijmarshausen. “Rapid prototyping has been used by the aircraft and automotive industries for years, but now we’re making it accessible to consumers.”

Users submit their design in digital form, after which Shapeways’s software checks it over to ensure that it can be made. Shapeways then passes the design to its production line of polymer printers, delivering the tangible object within 10 days of ordering, with prices typically between $50 and $150.