David Kirkpatrick

October 22, 2008

Charlie Cook breaks down …

Filed under: Politics — Tags: , , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 10:51 pm

… the dwindling hopes for McCain and the GOP.

From the link:

At this point it would be difficult to see Republican losses in the Senate and House to be fewer than seven and 20 respectively. A very challenging situation going into September turned into a meltdown last month, the most dire predictions for the GOP early on became the most likely outcome.

The metrics of this election argue strongly that this campaign is over, it’s only the memory of many an election that seemed over but wasn’t that is keeping us from closing the book mentally on this one. First, no candidate behind this far in the national polls, this late in the campaign has come back to win. Sure, we have seen come-from-behind victories, but they didn’t come back this far this late.

Second, early voting has made comebacks harder and would tend to diminish the impact of the kind of late-breaking development that might save McCain’s candidacy. With as many as one-third of voters likely to cast their ballot before Election Day, every day more are cast and the campaign is effectively over for them. The longer Obama has this kind of lead and the more votes are cast early, the more voters are out of the pool for McCain.

One word — ouch.

January 29, 2008

Negroponte admits use of waterboarding

Filed under: Politics — Tags: , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:06 am

John Negroponte, the former Director of National Intelligence, admitted the United States used the waterboarding torture technique in 2002 and 2003. Various administration officials have danced around the subject of whether the US government actually waterboarded anyone we took into custody, but none have ever come out and directly confirmed using the interrogation technique.

Negroponte, in an interview published last Friday by the National Journal, had this to say, “We’ve taken steps to address the issue of interrogations, for instance, and waterboarding has not been used in years. It wasn’t used when I was director of national intelligence, nor even for a few years before that.”

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