David Kirkpatrick

February 2, 2010

The latest miracle material — spray-on liquid glass

Sounds pretty amazing at first glance. Just read the lead graf below.

From the link:

Spray-on liquid glass is transparent, non-toxic, and can protect virtually any surface against almost any damage from hazards such as water, UV radiation, dirt, heat, and bacterial infections. The coating is also flexible and breathable, which makes it suitable for use on an enormous array of products.

The liquid glass spray (technically termed “SiO2 ultra-thin layering”) consists of almost pure  (, the normal compound in glass) extracted from quartz sand. Water or ethanol is added, depending on the type of surface to be coated. There are no additives, and the nano-scale glass coating bonds to the surface because of the quantum forces involved. According to the manufacturers, liquid glass has a long-lasting antibacterial effect because microbes landing on the surface cannot divide or replicate easily.

Liquid glass was invented in Turkey and the patent is held by Nanopool, a family-owned German company. Research on the product was carried out at the Saarbrücken Institute for New Materials. Nanopool is already in negotiations in the UK with a number of companies and with the National Health Service, with a view to its widespread adoption.

The liquid glass spray produces a water-resistant coating only around 100 nanometers (15-30 molecules) thick. On this  the glass is highly flexible and breathable. The coating is environmentally harmless and non-toxic, and easy to clean using only water or a simple wipe with a damp cloth. It repels bacteria, water and dirt, and resists heat,  and even acids. UK project manager with Nanopool, Neil McClelland, said soon almost every product you purchase will be coated with liquid glass.

February 26, 2009

Ultra high-density computer memory

Density to the tune of 10 terabits per square inch through use of a nanomaterial.

From the link:

The self-assembling of materials known as block copolymers could provide a low-cost, efficient way to fabricate ultra-high-density computer memory. Block copolymers, which are made of chemically different polymers linked together, can arrange themselves into arrays of nanoscale dots on surfaces, which could be used as templates for creating tiny magnetic bits that store data on hard disks. Until now, though, there was no simple, quick way to coax the block copolymer to make the desired arrays over large areas.

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst have found a simple way to coat square inches of substrate with block copolymers. The highly ordered pattern formed by the copolymers could be used to create hard disks with 10 terabits squeezed into a square inch, the researchers report this week in Science.

March 13, 2008

Solid state drives and pliable nanomaterial

Filed under: Business, Media, Science, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 10:14 am

Two interesting bits of news from KurzweilAI.net today.

The first is Intel announces 160 gig solid state drives are soon to market.

The second covers somewhat surprising physical properties of nanomaterials.

Intel confirms 160GB solid-state drives will be unveiled soon
Computerworld, Mar. 11, 2008Intel is close to unveiling a new line of solid-state drives for laptop and notebook PCs that will feature a storage capacity up to 160GB, putting solid-state drives in direct competition with hard drives.
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Nanomaterials show unexpected strength under stress
Nanowerk News, Mar. 12, 2008University of Maryland-College Park and NIST researchers have discovered that materials such as silica that are quite brittle in bulk form behave as ductile as gold at the nanoscale.

At the macroscale, the point at which a material will fail or break depends on its ability to maintain its shape when stressed. The atoms of ductile substances are able to shuffle around and remain cohesive for much longer than brittle substances containing faint structural flaws that act as failure points. At the nanoscale, these structural flaws do not exist, and hence the materials are nearly “perfect.”
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