David Kirkpatrick

July 9, 2009

Bush-era CIA lied to Congress

Filed under: Politics — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 12:29 am

Disappointing but not surprising.

Guess someone owes Pelosi an apology. She’s annoying, but certainly called a spade a spade when accusing the CIA of dissembling.

From the link:

In a June 26 letter to Mr. Panetta discussing his testimony, Democrats said that the agency had “misled members” of Congress for eight years about the classified matters, which the letter did not disclose. “This is similar to other deceptions of which we are aware from other recent periods,” said the letter, made public late Wednesday by Representative Rush D. Holt, Democrat of New Jersey, one of the signers.

In an interview, Mr. Holt declined to reveal the nature of the C.I.A.’s alleged deceptions,. But he said, “We wouldn’t be doing this over a trivial matter.”

January 5, 2009

Panetta to head CIA

Filed under: Politics — Tags: , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:55 pm

An interesting choice for a beleaguered agency. Panetta will have his hands full between dealing with the Bush 43 torture aftermath, international terrorism and a somewhat tarnished public brand.

From the link:

President-elect Barack Obama has selected Leon E. Panetta, the former congressman and White House chief of staff, to take over the Central Intelligence Agency, an organization that Mr. Obama criticized during the campaign for using interrogation methods he decried as torture, Democratic officials said Monday.

Mr. Panetta has a reputation in Washington as a competent manager with strong background in budget issues, but has little hands-on intelligence experience. If confirmed by the Senate, he will take control of the agency most directly responsible for hunting senior Al Qaeda leaders around the globe, but one that has been buffeted since the Sept. 11 attacks by leadership changes and morale problems.

Given his background, Mr. Panetta is a somewhat unusual choice to lead the C.I.A., an agency that has been unwelcoming to previous directors perceived as outsiders, such as Stansfield M. Turner and John M. Deutch. But his selection points up the difficulty Mr. Obama had in finding a C.I.A. director with no connection to controversial counterterrorism programs of the Bush era.