David Kirkpatrick

December 21, 2009

Monday video fun — “Prisencolinensinainciusol”

Filed under: Arts, et.al., Media — Tags: , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 10:40 pm

From the Wikipedia page on the song:

“Prisencolinensinainciusol” is a song composed by Adriano Celentano, and performed by Celentano and Raffaella Carrà. It was first released as a single on November 3, 1972, later also on his album Nostalrock. The lyrics are pure gibberish, intended to sound like American English as heard by a non English-speaker. In an interview, Celentano explains that the song is about “incommunicability” because in modern times people are not able to communicate to each other anymore. He added the only word we need is “prisencolinensinainciusol” which is supposed to stand for “universal love.”

And now, the video:

November 27, 2009

NFL Network inadvertendly airs blue language

Filed under: et.al., Media, Sports — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 10:47 am

So (expletive) what.

And why is ESPN breathlessly reporting on this non-story?

From the link:

The NFL Network accidentally aired a vulgarity yelled by Denver Broncos coach Josh McDaniels as he chastised his players on the sideline of their Thanksgiving night game against the New York Giants.

Coming out of a commercial break following a series of false starts near the goal line that resulted in Denver settling for a field goal, the NFL Network showed a clip of McDaniels, who yelled at his players: “All we’re trying to do is win a (expletive) game!”

October 5, 2009

Conservapedia wants to rewrite the Bible

Filed under: Arts, et.al., Media, Politics, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:21 pm

I say let ’em have at it.

And in contradiction to beliefnet commenter Joshua Zelinsky, I say it’s not surprising at all:

The combination of ignorance and arrogance is shocking.

(Hat tip: the Daily Dish)

July 8, 2009

Deciphering the latest tech buzzwords

Filed under: Business, et.al., Media, Technology — Tags: , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:57 pm

A handy list from CIO.com allowing everyone to drill down into the cloud-like synergistic world of information technology buzzwords. Or maybe it just helps you wade through the latest in corporate-speak BS. I’m going for the latter.

Of course there’s a few culprit on this list that have gray whiskers, so it’s not quite the latest in buzziness.

From the link, this one’s a beauty (and one I haven’t heard before unless I actively blocked it from my memory — admittedly a possibility):

Buzzword #6: Prosumer

This one is mercifully used less frequently nowadays by marketing departments, as it stands out as one of the most irritating buzzwords ever concocted. Essentially, it’s a mix of “professional” and “consumer.” A “prosumer” product, therefore, is a product that can meet users’ business and personal needs.

Now that this wicked buzzword has been unleashed upon the world, it is routinely used in PR pitch monstrosities that say things such as: “PressureWashersDirect.com today released its recommendations for the best prosumer gas pressure washers” and “Sony is expanding its industry leading line-up of high-definition video products with two new HDV(TM) cameras designed to meet the needs of professionals and prosumers.”

January 24, 2009

Nanny state in legislation — South Carolina

This’ll never go anywhere and is just political posturing, but it’s still sickening to think a public official would even want to make a point by attempting to gut the First Amendment.

From the link:

State Senator Robert Ford is hoping to outlaw lewd language and is pushing for a bill that would prohibit profanity.

Under the pre-filed bill, profanity could land you in jail for up to 5 years and/or cost you up to $5,000 in fines.

Which words are exactly considered profane is still unclear, but the bill does have a list of qualifications for profanity including words or actions that are lewd, vulgar or indecent in nature.

We spoke to Debra Gammons with the Charleston School of Law about freedom of speech.

She reminds that the First Amendment is not absolute. You cannot say whatever you want whenever you want to.

Courts will usually look at where the words were said and who heard them. Children are usually protected.

Er, Debra you might not want to take that argument to the Supreme Court. Fire in a theater, okay that’s a public safety issue. Salty language at the mall? Not so much. No threat to anyone other than the easily offended. Maybe not too couth, but definitely not criminal.

December 7, 2008

Scalia and golly waddles

Filed under: Arts, et.al., Politics — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 1:37 pm

From the Daily Dish:

Jay Wexler was amused by FCC v. Fox Television Stations, Inc, a Supreme Court case about profanity:

The oral argument in the case had many funny moments.  By far the best one was when, in the midst of a back-and-forth with Carter Phillips regarding how the words “fuck” and “shit” may or may not get their special force from being connected to sexual and excretory activity, Justice Scalia said, and I kid you not, “Don’t use golly waddles instead of the F word.”

Ladies and gentlemen, your Supreme Court. Afraid of language as it is actually used. I shudder to think about Antonin’s dirty talk.

Seriously though, this is ridiculous. This is the highest court in our land. There is no room for prudery or the need for juvenile euphemism when discussing matters that in some cases involves life and death. (Obviously this doesn’t quite meet that standard.) Frankly, it’s fucking embarrassing.