David Kirkpatrick

July 13, 2010

No, we don’t need another IT acronym

Filed under: Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 10:35 am

This bit of linguistic and businessspeak stupidity comes courtesy of Computerworld‘s editor-in-chief:

The consumerization of IT is becoming a landslide, big enough to have its own acronym — I nominate “CoIT.” But I’m not sure many enterprises are all that aware of it.

He’s clearly out of his depth as an editor because that job entails making certain every word, sentence and graph in the publication is easily understood by the target audience. It does not entail creating unnecessary, and quite inelegant to boot, acronyms to add to the overflowing alphabet soup bowl that’s already out there and too firmly entrenched to do anything about.

It’s a shame because the article linked in the opening sentence is actually pretty good and covers an important topic — the use of consumer electronics in the business world. The story is almost fatally marred by the author’s repeated use of his made-up acronym. I can only assume he hopes the acronym catches on for personal satisfaction, because really it’s just too hard to come up with a few two or three word iterations on the phrase “consumerization of IT.”

October 19, 2009

The Federal IT Dashboard

Filed under: Business, Politics, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 1:10 pm

Too bad something like this doesn’t exist for the entire U.S. budget. If you want to see where government IT spending ends up, the new Federal IT Dashboard is for you. It’s part of a “radical transparency” policy of the new federal CIO.

From the link:

It has been an interesting year – who would have thought that the federal government would have done such a thing – provided a Federal IT Dashboard of allocation of federal IT dollars to investments for all of us out there in citizen-land to read? Federal CIO, Vivek Kundra, announced it and the keyword of the effort that made the headlines is “radical transparency.”  It’s very clever in its design and visuals – “mashup ready.” It would be especially appealing if the shell of the software would be made available to anyone who wants it – since some real (taxpayer) money went into this project.

It’s a pretty cool dashboard from which we can learn that services for citizens are out spent by projects for management of government resources and that most VA projects are behind schedule.  And it is truly impressive that it is possible for the citizenry to comment, grab info to Tweet, and generally know which project dollar is where. So, should CIOs from the private sector or from non-US government organizations look at this as a transparency role model?