David Kirkpatrick

July 27, 2009

Finding jobs on Twitter

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 4:04 pm

If you’re looking for work, Twitter is now a destination for openings. Check out this CIO.com article for tips on finding work via Twitter.

From the link:

But using Twitter to find new work isn’t a straightforward process. Because people publish so frequently, it’s easy to miss a lead in the process. Also, Twitter’s search tool, while serviceable, sometimes makes it hard to narrow your job inquiries down to something specific.

We spoke with some career experts about how you can search wisely. In general, you must sieve through hashtags, a symbol (#) Twitter users assign to their tweets that sorts them into different categories (I wrote a CIO.com overview on Twitter hashtags a few months ago). We also learned about a few Twitter handles (Twitter user names) that post some helpful content if you’re trying to land your next gig.

May 13, 2009

Everything Twitter

Filed under: Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:10 pm

Well, not everything since I’ve done plenty of blogging about the microblogging/social networking application and website.

Here’s three offerings on Twitter from CIO.com — a comprehensive overview that is an excellent place to begin for every tweeting experience level, a great explanation of hashtags (using “#” in front of a key descriptor, such as #followfriday) in Twitter and a blog post blaming Twitter power users for running off the latest wave in new tweeters.

From the comprehensive overview:

Twitter Etiquette: Five Dos and Don’ts

Twitter beginners need to understand the rules of etiquette for the service. So before you stick a foot measuring 140-characters-or-less in your mouth, check out our advice on how to follow and un-follow, share politely, direct message appropriately, and more.

From the explanation of hashtags:

Twitter (the company) didn’t create hashtags. The Twitter community’s early adopters came up with the idea to put a “#” in front of topics to add context to tweets. The tag would also help filter and sort them out for future readers.

According to a Twitter fan website, the hashtags achieved significant notoriety with Twitter users in 2007 during the San Diego fires, when users designated their tweets with “#sandiegofires.”

The trend to use hashtags led to the community-driven site hashtags.org, where a semi-official index of Twitter’s hashtags now resides. To access the site, Twitter users merely need to opt-in (for free) by following @hashtags on Twitter.

And finally, from the blog post on ill mannered power users:

The rise of Twitter’s user-base has differed from Facebook, which grew upon a mainstream audience of college and high school kids looking to post photos and share the details of a Saturday night. While they were tech-savvy in the sense that they grew up with the Web, they weren’t “techy.” To them, the Web and technology just exists — and nothing more. 

Twitter has traveled a different road with its user base. Tech nerds and social media evangelists populated the service initially, followed by traditional media and public relations folks who wanted to track them. Soon, businesses and some over-aggressive marketers hopped in on the fun, before leading to famed celebrity accounts.

You can find on Twitter at http://twitter.com/davidkonline.