David Kirkpatrick

February 26, 2009

Free markets=crazy?

Filed under: Business, Politics — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 4:03 pm

I’m thinking Harvard Law is the one full of the crazy here.

From the  link:

I don’t know whether this belongs in the comic-relief category or the future-threats category, but the Harvard Law School is having a conference to analyze the “free market mindset.” The basic premise of the conference seems to be that people who believe in limited government are psychologically troubled.

The conference schedule features presentations such as “How Thinking Like an Economist Undermines Community” and “Addicted to Incentives: How the Ideology of Self Interest Can Be Self-Fulfilling.” The most absurd presentation, though, may be the one entitled, “Colossal Failure: The Output Bias of Market Economies.” According to the description, the author argues that the market “delivers excessive levels of consumption.” Damn those entrepreneurs for creating so much wealth!

January 7, 2009

Kagan to be next solicitor general

Filed under: Politics — Tags: , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 1:17 am

This from Cato-at-Liberty:

The selection of Harvard Law School Dean Elana Kagan to be the next solicitor general (and the first woman nominated for a position known as the “Tenth Justice”) is not at all surprising. 

One reason I supported Obama this past election was his stance on civil liberties. Presidencies can get derailed by any number of things — 9/11 anyone? — but I hold out very high hopes for civil liberties under an Obama administration.

There’s going to be a lot that I’ll be holding my nose over, but I see a tremendous upside if he can maintain the momentum. So far in the transition period, I’ve been pleased with his actions and appointments.

Also from the Cato link:

Two things we know about Kagan is that she is very smart – even before the Supreme Court clerkship and record of scholarship, she won a Sachs Scholarship, sometimes called a “Princeton Rhodes” – and has done a fabulous job as dean (including poaching star professors from law schools across the country).  While the White House and Attorney General will, of course, be setting the administration’s legal policy, we can expect Kagan to defend those policy positions ferociously and expertly.  Whether those efforts will coincide with a defense of the individual liberty and limited government encapsulated in the Constitution remains to be seen.