David Kirkpatrick

January 25, 2010

White House throwing the middle class a lifeline

Here’s some of the options on the table:

The initiatives were developed by the White House Task Force on Middle Class Families, led by Vice President Joe Biden. The proposals would:

* Require companies that do not offer retirement plans to enroll their employees in direct-deposit retirement accounts unless the workers opt out.

* Increase the “Savers Credit,” a tax credit for retirement savings, for families making up to $85,000.

* Change some of the rules for 401(k) employer-sponsored retirement savings accounts to make them more transparent.

* Increase the child tax credit rate to 35 percent of qualifying expenses from the current 20 percent for families making under $85,000 a year. Families making up to $115,000 would be eligible for some increase in the tax credit.

* Increase child care funding by $1.6 billion in 2011 to serve an additional 235,000 children.

* Boost government spending by $102.5 million for programs aimed at helping families who provide home care for an aging relative.

* Ease the burden for student loans by limiting a borrower’s payments to 10 percent of his or her income above a basic living allowance.

October 19, 2009

The Federal IT Dashboard

Filed under: Business, Politics, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 1:10 pm

Too bad something like this doesn’t exist for the entire U.S. budget. If you want to see where government IT spending ends up, the new Federal IT Dashboard is for you. It’s part of a “radical transparency” policy of the new federal CIO.

From the link:

It has been an interesting year – who would have thought that the federal government would have done such a thing – provided a Federal IT Dashboard of allocation of federal IT dollars to investments for all of us out there in citizen-land to read? Federal CIO, Vivek Kundra, announced it and the keyword of the effort that made the headlines is “radical transparency.”  It’s very clever in its design and visuals – “mashup ready.” It would be especially appealing if the shell of the software would be made available to anyone who wants it – since some real (taxpayer) money went into this project.

It’s a pretty cool dashboard from which we can learn that services for citizens are out spent by projects for management of government resources and that most VA projects are behind schedule.  And it is truly impressive that it is possible for the citizenry to comment, grab info to Tweet, and generally know which project dollar is where. So, should CIOs from the private sector or from non-US government organizations look at this as a transparency role model?