David Kirkpatrick

February 16, 2010

Book authorship made easy

Filed under: Arts, Business, et.al., Media — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 12:28 pm

Via KurzaweilAI.net – This idea goes a bit past simply hiring a ghostwriter …

FastPencil lets thought leaders publish books without the hassle of writing them
VentureBeat, Feb. 16, 2010

Self-publishing site FastPencil has launched a new program aimed at helping aspiring thought leaders publish the books in their heads:

  • A personal book authoring team to manage the entire book writing process. You run your business, they co-write your book.
  • Full print and eBook distribution services to Amazon and elsewhere.
  • Social media promotion services.
    Read Original Article>>
  • February 4, 2010

    Is Amazon in an e-book panic?

    Filed under: Arts, Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 4:12 pm

    Yes is a very fair answer. Last week it got into, and lost, a scrap with Macmillan, one of the largest English  language publishers. Possibly because of Apple’s iPad announcement and demo.

    From the second link:

    It all started last week when Apple CEO Steve Jobs trotted out the iPad, dubbed by some as a Kindle killer. Major publishers voiced their support for the iPad, including Penguin, HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster, Hachette Group, and Macmillan.

    Then Jobs showed off one of the iPad’s critical apps, the iBook e-reader, and flashed prices for e-books at around $15. It was a swipe at Amazon.com because publishers (Macmillan being one of them) had been trying to get Amazon.com to raise its e-book price from $10.

    And:

    On Friday, Amazon.com stunned the publishing world by pulling Macmillan books, both Kindle editions and printed books, from its shelves in an apparent strong-arm tactic to show Macmillan that Amazon.com continues to set the rules. At the very least, Amazon.com wanted to show that Macmillan, which is among the biggest publishers in the U.S., still needs Amazon.com.

    One would have hoped that Amazon.com had spent considerable time weighing this decision. Instead, it looked like a giant company suddenly deciding to play chicken with another giant company—and Amazon.com flinched. On Sunday, only two days after pulling Macmillan books, Amazon.com relented.

    Now there’s this news from the seemingly flailing e-tailer:

    Is Amazon Building a Superkindle?
    New York Times, Feb. 3, 2010

    Amazon has acquired Touchco, a New York start-up that was developing flexible, transparent, force-sensitive multitouch panels.

    The acquisition indicates what Amazon might try to do next in response to Apple’s iPad announcement: a future full-color, more-rugged multitouch Kindle.


    Read Original Article>>

    September 15, 2008

    Plastic Logic to launch e-reader in 2009

    Filed under: Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 12:22 am

    Looks like very early 2009.

    From the link:

    This Wednesday, Cambridge University startup Plastic Logic, which is headquartered in Mountain View, CA, will open a factory in Dresden, Germany, that will produce about 11 million large, flexible electronic-paper display units a year. The displays will be used in an electronic reader that the company showed at the Demo conference in San Diego last week. The product, which is scheduled to be commercially launched in January, uses display technology from E Ink and backplane technologies that employ polymer electronics developed by Plastic Logic’s founders at Cambridge University

    Plastic Logic is banking that there’s room on the market for another e-book, this one targeted at businesspeople who want to read documents and newspapers on a lightweight, robust device with a large display. Several portable electronic readers already on the market also employ the E Ink display technology and enable users to take thousands of pages of documents on the road. Amazon’s Kindle and the Sony Reader have six-inch screens–about the size of a paperback book. The Readius, made by Polymer Vision–a spinout from Philips Electronics–is the size of a cell phone and has a rollable display that stows away.