David Kirkpatrick

February 6, 2009

The digital world and the entertainment industry

Filed under: Arts, Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 1:59 pm

I’ve blogged on the battle betweendigital media and the entertainment industry (link goes search for RIAA, but both RIAA and MPAA are equally stupid on this topic. The RIAA is just a little more stupid) and how futile this fight is for the dinosaurs.

In fact, the war is over and the industry has lost. Lost credibility, angered customers and is now way behind a curve that could have been used as a slingshot into the future. Instead both the RIAA and MPAA are floundering.

I don’t the MPAA is going anywhere, but I wouldn’t be the least bit surprised if the RIAA either ceases to exist, or continues in a radically different form within five years. I can see the major labels pulling away from an organization that increasingly acts like a cornered, dying beast.

Here’s a story on how “digital pirates” are blowing past every blockade Hollywood movie studios throw in the way.

From the link:

On the day last July when ”The Dark Knight” arrived in theaters, Warner Brothers was ready with an ambitious antipiracy campaign that involved months of planning and steps to monitor each physical copy of the film.

The campaign failed miserably. By the end of the year, illegal copies of the Batman movie had been downloaded more than seven million times around the world, according to the media measurement firm BigChampagne, turning it into a visible symbol of Hollywood’s helplessness against the growing problem of online video piracy.

 

The culprits, in this case, are the anonymous pirates who put the film online and enabled millions of Internet users to view it. Because of widely available broadband access and a new wave of streaming sites, it has become surprisingly easy to watch pirated video online — a troubling development for entertainment executives and copyright lawyers.

Hollywood may at last be having its Napster moment — struggling against the video version of the digital looting that capsized the music business. Media companies say that piracy — some prefer to call it ”digital theft” to emphasize the criminal nature of the act — is an increasingly mainstream pursuit. At the same time, DVD sales, a huge source of revenue for film studios, are sagging. In 2008, DVD shipments dropped to their lowest levels in five years. Executives worry that the economic downturn will persuade more users to watch stolen shows and movies.