David Kirkpatrick

April 7, 2008

Cruciverb.com

Filed under: Arts, et.al., Media — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 1:43 am

As a companion to a post from late last week about a crossword solver’s blog, here’s a link to cruciverb.com. Crossword creators are formally called cruciverbalists, and cruciverb.com is a site for creators and avid solvers of crossword puzzles.

Once again I give credit to Matt Gaffney’s “Grid Lock” for pointing me to this interesting site. If you’re a crossword fan, visiting cruciverb.com is well worth the time.

From “About This Site” at cruciverb.com:

The CRUCIVERB.COM web site is a resource center for crossword puzzle constructors. There is an associated mailing list called CRUCIVERB-L which is used for discussing crossword construction via email. Most of our discussions focus on American-style crossword puzzles rather than cryptics.

April 4, 2008

Daily crossword solving blog

Filed under: Arts, et.al., Media — Tags: , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:53 am

I’m reading “Grid Lock” by Matt Gaffney about the world of crossword puzzle creators and solvers. He mentions a blog written by Amy Reynaldo, a “top solver.”

Her blog is titled “Diary of a Crossword Fiend” and consists of her solving time for a number of newspaper’s crosswords each day, plus some commentary about the puzzles.

I think this sort of blog is what makes the internet so great. I remember back in the mid- to late-90s surfing and finding all sorts of odds and ends that were simply fun. Amy’s blog is one of those pieces of the world wide web that’s just fun.

Here’s her times for today:

Friday, 4/4

NYS 8:26
NYT 6:57
Jonesin’ tba
CHE tba
LAT tba
CS tba
WSJ tba

(Update — commentary from post removed per author’s request)

February 26, 2008

Cricklers dot com

Filed under: Arts, et.al., Media — Tags: , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:05 am

If you enjoy word games, go check out Cricklers. I play almost every day.

I’ll let the creators describe the online fun:

Cricklers are a new type of word puzzle.  We set out to totally re-invent the crossword puzzle for the computer age.  Traditional crossword puzzles are incredibly successful but they have several serious drawbacks: (1) They are difficult to construct, (2) Most words are short and often silly — chosen only because they fit, (3) Matching clues to numbers is a distraction, and (4) A given puzzle is usually either too easy or too hard.