David Kirkpatrick

October 3, 2008

Microsoft gets scare as P&G considered Google Apps

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 11:28 am

This CIO.com article outlines the measures Microsoft went to in order to keep Procter & Gamble as a customer. P&G was seriously considering moving the entire company away from Microsoft products in favor of Google Apps after some in the company were using, and liking, the Google product.

From the link:

Microsoft is now taking the threat from Google quite seriously: In July 2008 COO Kevin Turner was dispatched to consumer-products giant Procter & Gamble to dissuade P&G from moving to Google Apps—and ditching Microsoft.

Back in February 2007, Google launched the Google Apps edition for businesses. Executives told media outlets that initial customers included a unit of Procter & Gamble. At some point in 2008, hundreds of P&G employees were testing Google’s e-mail, word-processing and spreadsheet applications as potential replacements for Microsoft products, according to a recent Bloomberg article about the P&G incident.

P&G execs viewed Google’s new tools as cheaper and more Internet-capable options than what Microsoft was delivering. (To read two stories of large organizations adopting Google Apps, see “Fighting Government Waste One Google App At a Time” and “Cost Savings Found When Microsoft Outlook Ousted for Gmail at British Construction Firm.”)

P&G, of course, is a massive consumer products goods company, with $84 billion in annual revenue this past year. To lose that kind of a customer—especially to Google—would have been catastrophic for Microsoft.

March 14, 2008

Superdelegates to the Democratic Party rescue?

Filed under: Politics — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 10:25 am

This Bloomberg story may provide the clear blueprint to save the Democratic Party from itself since no individuals seem up to the task.

From the first link:

March 14 (Bloomberg) — Barack Obama has pulled almost even with Hillary Clinton in endorsements from top elected officials and has cut into her lead among the other superdelegates she’s relying on to win the Democratic presidential nomination.

Among the 313 of 796 superdelegates who are members of Congress or governors, Clinton has commitments from 103 and Obama is backed by 96, according to lists supplied by the campaigns. Fifty-three of Obama’s endorsements have come since he won the Jan. 3 Iowa caucuses, compared with 12 who have aligned with Clinton since then.

“That’s not glacial, that is a remarkable momentum,” Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri, a superdelegate and Obama supporter, said in an interview. “I don’t think there is anything that will slow that down.”

Someone in party leadership ought to do some serious numbers-crunching (more serious than the various “delegate math” exercises done by the media, and occasionally posted on by me and other bloggers) on what is left in the nomination process and what it will take for Obama to secure the Democratic bid for president. Once that superdelegate magic number is clarified, the party leader should get hard pledges from enough supers to reach the magic number, go to Clinton behind the scenes and ask her to step down or the supers will all go public en masse and publicly, and humiliatingly, end her failing and divisive bid.

It may be a plan along these lines is in place already and will be set into motion after Pennsylvania votes, Clinton wins big as expected and her campaign goes back into the ridiculous “she’s inevitable” mode because of the win.

Here’s more interesting bits from the Bloomberg link:

Both sides agree her chance to win the nomination rests on winning a significant majority of superdelegates because Obama is likely to maintain a lead of at least 150 pledged delegates – – those won in primaries and caucuses — after the last contest is finished. If he does, Clinton, 60, would have to snag more than 70 percent of the remaining 334 or so superdelegates.

And:

Senator Ben Nelson of Nebraska said Obama, unlike Clinton, stands a chance of winning at least part of his state, which has voted Republican in every presidential election since 1964 and is one of two states that award some presidential electoral votes by congressional district rather than winner-take-all.

“Obama has coattails in Nebraska,” said Nelson, who endorsed his Senate colleague two months ago. “Our internal polls show he can win one, possibly two, congressional districts.”

And:

The same holds true in Ohio, which Clinton won, and Pennsylvania, where voter surveys say she is leading in the April 22 primary. Polls show Obama does as well or better than Clinton against McCain in those crucial swing states.

In Iowa, a February Des Moines Register poll showed Obama beating McCain 53 percent to 36 percent, while McCain beat Clinton 49 percent to 40 percent.

That is one of the reasons he’s won support from governors in Republican-leaning states, including Kathleen Sebelius of Kansas, Janet Napolitano of Arizona and Iowa’s Chet Culver.

March 3, 2008

Chavez aiding S. American terrorists?

Filed under: et.al., Media, Politics — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:49 pm

This Bloomberg story doesn’t look too good for the portly Venezuelan dictator:

Colombia Files Show Chavez Funded FARC, Rebels Sought Uranium

By Helen Murphy

March 3 (Bloomberg) — Colombia’s police chief Oscar Naranjo said documents from the computer of a guerrilla leader killed last weekend in Ecuador show links to Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez.

The documents on the computer of Raul Reyes, the second in command of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, indicate that Venezuela provided the guerrillas with at least $300 million and would help Chavez in the event of a U.S. attack on Venezuela.

Naranjo said the FARC, as the group is known, was seeking to buy 50 kilos of uranium for bomb making with aim of getting involved in international terrorism.

To contact the reporter on this story: Helen Murphy in Bogota at Hmurphy1@bloomberg.net .

(Hat tip: Fark)

January 25, 2008

Nanny state in action NYC style

Filed under: et.al., Politics — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 8:37 pm

The Village Voice has an article covering a proposed New York City law to outlaw any device monitoring air quality (for pretty much any toxin) without prior approval from the police in the form of a permit.

From the article:

Damn you, Osama bin Laden! Here’s another rotten thing you’ve done to us: After 9/11, untold thousands of New Yorkers bought machines that detect traces of biological, chemical, and radiological weapons. But a lot of these machines didn’t work right, and when they registered false alarms, the police had to spend millions of dollars chasing bad leads and throwing the public into a state of raw panic.

OK, none of that has actually happened. But Richard Falkenrath, the NYPD’s deputy commissioner for counterterrorism, knows that it’s just a matter of time. That’s why he and Mayor Michael Bloomberg have asked the City Council to pass a law requiring anyone who wants to own such detectors to get a permit from the police first.

(Hat tip: Hit & Run)