David Kirkpatrick

December 23, 2011

“The Blackwater dudes would play Nickelback … “

Filed under: Arts, et.al., Politics — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 9:58 am

Talk about the bar from hell — in the midst of Iraq’s Green Zone during the worst of the war, everyone’s favorite “security contractor” (nee Blackwater, nee Xe, now Academi) allowed its employees to frequent a speakeasy and soil the airspace with cover songs.

Hope this doesn’t ruin your holiday cheer, but from the link:

Bearman: There actually wasn’t a jukebox. They had a stereo system with an iPod attachment. They played random music. No one gave me a playlist, but they had to take Men At Work off because Aussie security contractors would go apeshit when Men At Work came on. Which I understand! When i’m in a war zone and drinking, I kind of want to let off a little steam, too.

But actually, sometimes they had live bands. Contractors who were over there a long time would bring instruments and musical equipment. There would be jammy, crappy cover bands. The Aegis guys would play the Kinks. The Blackwater dudes would play Nickelback. There was a strong cultural difference in what mercenaries were into, musically speaking.

Advertisements

August 13, 2008

Blackwater facing auditor questions

Filed under: Business, Politics — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 4:38 pm

Embattled Iraq civilian contractor, Blackwater (read about its misdeeds here) is facing some serious auditing questions after apparently obtaining federal contracts meant for small businesses through creative employee designations. The total of the contracts in dispute is over $100 million.

From the AccountantsWorld (second) link:

The companies could have skirted small business size criteria because they counted many workers as independent contractors, not employees, which allowed them to exceed the 1,500-employee ceiling set in some contracts, according to the auditors.

The inspector general’s office found that Blackwater and the other companies’ sizes and revenues may have ”involved misrepresentations,” and suggested that the agency may want to ”determine whether it is appropriate for Blackwater affiliates to continue receiving small business set-aside contracts.”

When rival firms had challenged the 2006 contract for helicopter services to Presidential Airways on grounds that the company was too large, the airline provided data that 28 Blackwater-affiliated entities had a total of only 715 employees.

But the inspector general found that Blackwater had hired more than a thousand independent contractors and treated them as if they were regular employees, with scheduled shifts, for example, which called the size determination into question. The report also said the Small Business Administration should have ”attempted to reconcile discrepancies” in the data Blackwater provided.