David Kirkpatrick

March 10, 2010

The barcode as bulletin board

Filed under: Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:16 pm

Via KurzweilAI.net — Interesting idea, but boy does this seem ripe for abuse. Imagine a bored fourteen-year-old boy armed with an Android phone and this app left alone in a grocery store. Video message pron anyone? Or malware compromised webpage for that matter.

The Secret Lives Of Objects: StickyBits Turn Barcodes Into Personal Message Boards
TechCrunch, Mar. 8, 2010

Stickybits, a new iPhone and Android app that lets you scan any barcode and attach a geo-tagged message to that physical object, has been launched by Stickybits.

The barcode in a greeting card, for instance, could trigger a video message from the sender. One on a box of medical supplies could inventory what is inside. A business card with a code on it could link to a resume or LinkedIn profile.

The app lets you follow people and see their object stream, or get notified whenever one of your objects is scanned, moved, or new bits are attached to them.

Stickybits is similar to science-fiction author Bruce Sterling’s concept of “Spimes.”
Read Original Article>>

August 12, 2009

Microsoft and Nokia join forces to take on BlackBerry

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 10:54 am

First Google hints at using Android to challenge Research in Motion’s BlackBerry for business mobile dominance, now Microsoft and Nokia announce a partnership for the same purpose.

Industry insiders have been speculating BlackBerry is sitting at an absolute peak and has nowhere to go but down. Looks like a lot of players have decided to enter the business mobile fray and put some of the speculation to the test.

From the second link:

Microsoft Corp and Nokia announced an alliance on Wednesday to bring advanced business software to smartphones in a bid to counter the dominance of Research in Motion Ltd’s Blackberry device.The alliance between the world’s largest software firm and the largest cellphone maker means the latest online versions of Microsoft’s Office suite of applications, including Word, Excel and PowerPoint, will be available on a range of Nokia handheld devices.

The two companies, at one time fierce rivals in the mobile telecommunications business, expect to offer Nokia phones running Office sometime next year, targeting the lucrative market for business users.

“This is giving some of our competitors — let’s spell it out, RIM — a run for their money,” said Nokia executive vice president Robert Andersson, in a telephone interview.

August 6, 2009

Will Google’s Android challenge BlackBerry …

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:27 pm

… as the go-to option business mobile? Looks like Google is at least making a push that direction.

From the link:

Google says future versions of its Android operating system will have a more business focus, putting it in greater competition with RIM. This is from a Reuters reportthat simply confirms the obvious: BlackBerry seems ripe for picking.

According to the news service, “Andy Rubin, Google’s top Android executive, said on Friday that as well as expanding consumer features like social networking and gaming, future Android versions would support businesses who give phones to employees working on the road.”

March 10, 2009

Google’s Android on the desktop?

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:53 pm

It may just end up there.

From the link:

It’s not news that Microsoft will get Windows 7 out as fast as possible this year. Vista has been a complete dog, so Microsoft will rush to deliver what is essentially a cleaned-up, lightweight version. What is news is that Google will have its own contender for desktop operating system king: Android.

Android, you ask? What would a Linux-based phone operating system be doing on the desktop? Running it, perhaps. You see, Matthäus Krzykowski and Daniel Hartmann, founders of start-up Mobile-facts, discovered late last year that Android has two product policies in its code. Product policies, they explained, are instructions in an operating system aimed at specific uses. Android’s two policies are phones and MIDs (mobile Internet devices). You probably know MIDs by their more popular name: netbooks.

The light begins to dawn, doesn’t it? But just because a program says it can do a job doesn’t mean it can actually deliver the goods. Recall, for example, just how well Vista ran on “Vista Capable” PCs.

So, Krzykowski and Hartmann decided to see if they could get Android to work on a netbook.

It took them about four hours to compile Android for an Asus’ Eee PC 1000H. Then, they reported on VentureBeat.com, “we got the netbook fully up and running on it, with nearly all of the necessary hardware you’d want — including graphics, sound and wireless card for Internet.” In other words, Android is already a desktop operating system.

September 24, 2008

Google’s OS for mobile phones introduced

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 10:20 am

Android, Google’s operating system for mobile devices was introduced yesterday. Looks like Google is pushing hard into established spaces — the browser war with Chrome, iPhone’s ubiquity with the Android OS, etc.

From the Technology Review link:

At a press conference in New York yesterday, Google and T-Mobile showed off the long-anticipated G1, a powerful smartphone that runs Google’s Android operating system for mobile devices.

The handset, priced at $179, will be available from T-Mobile on October 22. It boasts features to rank it at the top end of the smartphone market, and its software offers some neat surprises and tricks. At the same time, the G1 undoubtedly lacks the sparkle of the iPhone, probably its closest competitor. Furthermore, some experts question whether Google’s scheme for delivering new applications for the phone–an online store called Android Market–could run into problems that slow down mass adoption.

T-Mobile’s G1 is the first phone that uses Google’s Android operating system.

T-Mobile’s G1 is the first phone that uses Google’s Android operating system.