David Kirkpatrick

June 29, 2012

Just in time …

Filed under: et.al., Science — Tags: , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 5:04 pm

… for the weekend (and the 4th of July), good news for all the drinkers out there.

From the Medical Press link:

A new study led by University of Pittsburgh researchers reveals that moderate amounts of alcohol–consumed in a social setting–can enhance positive emotions and social bonding and relieve negative emotions among those drinking.

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March 17, 2011

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Filed under: et.al. — Tags: , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 5:05 pm

And remember, you better hope that beer is green from food coloring …

(photo credit: SpaceAgeSage)

March 17, 2010

In the nick of time …

Filed under: et.al., Media, Science — Tags: , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:47 pm

… for tonight’s revelries, the American Chemical Society comes through with the science on just why that hangover is ruining your life.

From the link:

When your head is pounding and you can’t stomach even a dry piece of toast, who among us has not asked why? Not, “Why did I drink so much?” but “Why is this happening to me?”

December 28, 2008

Research like this …

Filed under: et.al., Science — Tags: , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 6:21 pm

… just makes me want to drink more.

It does, but seriously since there’s a major night of binge drinking coming up do go for it, just don’t drive. Take a cab, get halfway through the label before eleven and don’t puke indoors.

The release:

T’is the season to be jolly?

As the party season approaches, a timely reminder of the issues surrounding the binge drinking culture are again highlighted by research into ‘young people and alcohol’ a team lead by Professor Christine Griffin, at the University of Bath. The research, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) suggests several considerations for future policy.

Focusing on the role of marketing practices in shaping young people’s attitudes to alcohol consumption, the research included analysis of 216 alcohol adverts, both in print and broadcast. While extreme drinking and determined drunkenness may be perceived as the norm amongst young people, there is some positive news from the research. Evidence suggests that increases in young people’s alcohol consumption is levelling off.

Previously, representations of binge drinking as a source of entertainment, coupled with pervasive coverage of drunken celebrities has increased the social acceptance of binge drinking. Advertising representing the ‘coolness’ of excessive drinking, along with the increasing use of internet based social networking sites that are used to share images of drunken nights out,, also enable the linkage between alcohol and ‘having fun’.

Looking at what steps society may need to take to tackle the scourge of binge drinking, Professor Griffin says, “Top of my list would have to be to stop demonizing and making generalisations about young people and their drinking. We also need to listen and incorporate their views and perspectives.”

Professor Isabelle Szmigin commented “Although many young people recognise the damage that ‘drinking too much’ can do to their health, and the associated risks of physical and sexual assault, few view these as more than short term problems.”

“The study suggests a radical re-thinking of national alcohol policy is required which takes into account the social character of alcohol consumption and the identity implications for young people,” said Professor Chris Hackley.

 

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NOTES FOR EDITORS

1. The research involved in-depth interviews with 89 young people in three UK regions over a period of three years and is part of the ‘Branded Consumption and Social Identification, Young People and Alcohol’ project under the ‘Identities and Social Actions’ programme (RES 148-25-0021). This research was graded as good.

2. Principal Investigator: Prof Christine Griffin, Psychology, University of Bath; and: Prof Isabelle Szmigin, The Business School, University of Birmingham; Dr Willm Mistral, Mental Health Research & Development Unit, University of Bath; Professor Chris Hackley, Management, Royal Holloway College, University of London; Research Assistants: Dr Andrew Bengry-Howell, Psychology, University of Bath; Dr David Clarke, The Business School, University of Birmingham. Placement Students, Louise Weale and Danielle Tynan, University of Bath.

3. The University of Bath is one of the UK’s leading universities, with an international reputation for quality research and teaching. In 15 subject areas the University of Bath is rated in the top ten in the country. View a full list of the University’s press releases: http://www.bath.ac.uk/news/releases/

4. The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is the UK’s largest funding agency for research, data resources and postgraduate training relating to social and economic issues. It supports independent, high quality research which impacts on business, the public sector and the third sector. The ESRC’s planned total expenditure in 2008/09 is £203 million. At any one time the ESRC supports over 4,000 researchers and postgraduate students in academic institutions and research policy institutes. More at http://www.esrcsocietytoday.ac.uk