David Kirkpatrick

August 3, 2010

A completely new path to solar efficiency?

Maybe so. And if so this sounds very promising. I’ll go ahead and repeat my solar energy mantra — two things both have to happen before solar is truly economically viable: costs must come down quite a bit, and the efficiency has to at least be within spitting distance of petroleum and other traditional natural resources. This sounds like very good news on the efficiency front. Might even offer some cost benefits as well.

From the link:

Stanford engineers have figured out how to simultaneously use the light and heat of the sun to generate electricity in a way that could make solar power production more than twice as efficient as existing methods and potentially cheap enough to compete with oil.

Unlike photovoltaic technology currently used in  – which becomes less efficient as the temperature rises – the new process excels at higher temperatures.

Called ‘photon enhanced thermionic emission,’ or PETE, the process promises to surpass the efficiency of existing photovoltaic and thermal conversion technologies.

“This is really a conceptual breakthrough, a new  process, not just a new material or a slightly different tweak,” said Nick Melosh, an assistant professor of materials science and engineering, who led the research group. “It is actually something fundamentally different about how you can harvest energy.”

And the materials needed to build a device to make the process work are cheap and easily available, meaning the power that comes from it will be affordable.

A small PETE device made with cesium-coated gallium nitride glows while being tested inside an ultra-high vacuum chamber. The tests proved that the process simultaneously converted light and heat energy into electrical current. Credit: Photo courtesy of Nick Melosh, Stanford University

2 Comments »

  1. I live in costa rica, central america. How can contribute to this project-technology. I want to learn. I want to become an active techonomist

    Comment by fernando — August 4, 2010 @ 9:38 am

  2. […] University of Toronto in Canada — davidkirkpatrick @ 3:05 pm Yesterday I blogged about a new solar energy process that might supplant photovoltaics, at least in large-scale desert installations because of […]

    Pingback by Lower cost solar cells « David Kirkpatrick — August 4, 2010 @ 3:06 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: