David Kirkpatrick

June 11, 2010

Latest satellite image of Deepwater Horizon spill

I’ll just let NASA’s image and caption do the work in illuminating BP’s ecological disaster:

NASA Visible Image of Gulf Oil Slick-June 10

Caption: NASA’s Aqua satellite flew over the Gulf of Mexico on Thursday, June 10 at 19:05 UTC (3:05 p.m. EDT) and the satellite’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured an image of the thickest part of the oil slick. In the image, the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico is positioned in sunglint. In the sunglint region—where the mirror-like reflection of the Sun gets blurred into a wide, bright silvery-gray strip—differences in the texture of the water surface may be enhanced. In the thickest part of the slick, oil smooths the water, making it a better “mirror.” Areas where thick oil cover the water are nearly white in this image. Additional oil may also be present.

Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team/ Holli Riebeek

Usage Restrictions: None

Related news release: NASA’s Aqua Satellite Saw Oil Slick in Sunglint on June 10

1 Comment »

  1. A natural disaster indescribable proportions: In the Gulf of Mexico flows apparently more oil per hour from the borehole to be accepted initially for one whole day was. Thus, all five days is expelled as much as a whole after the wreck of the Exxon Valdez. ” I wonder why the policy has not yet acted, and closing down the existing conveyor systems for now. Learning the politicians, because nothing of it.

    Comment by ebook leser — June 12, 2010 @ 12:04 am


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