David Kirkpatrick

June 30, 2008

Quantum stickiness, Hawking and teh funny

From KurzweilAI.net, micromachine stiction, Stephen Hawking tackles the universe’s inflation and defining humor.

How a quantum effect is gumming up nanomachines
New Scientist news service, June 28, 2008

Researchers are making progress in overcoming static friction, or or “stiction,” which sticks together the parts of micromachines on scales of between 10 and 300 nanometers and limits progress in reducing their size, affecting computer hard drives and other devices with small moving parts.

Stiction is due to the Casimir effect, a quantum-mechanics phenomenon that causes surfaces to be attracted. Methods to reduce its effect include use of patterned surfaces, suspending the components in a liquid, and use of metamaterials.

 
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Hawking ‘close’ to explaining universe’s inflation
New Scientist (article preview), June 28, 2008

Starting with current observations of the universe and working back to narrow down the initial set of possibilities and by treating the early cosmos as a quantum object with a multitude of alternative universes that gradually blend into ours, Stephen Hawking and colleagues think they are close to perfecting an answer to explain why the infant universe expanded so rapidly.

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Mechanism and function of humor identified by new evolutionary theory
PhysOrg.com, June 27, 2008

Humor occurs when the brain recognizes a pattern that surprises it, suggests Alastair Clarke in the forthcoming book, Humour.

“Now that we understand the mechanism of humour, the possibility of creating an artificial intelligence being that could develop its own sense of humour becomes very real,” he says. “This would, for the first time, create an AI capable of exhibiting one of the defining characteristics that make us human, making it seem significantly less robotic as a result.”

 
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2 Comments »

  1. […] @ 12:54 am I first blogged on the Casimir force, stiction and nanotech a couple of weeks ago (find that post here and check out the first item) Here’s some updated news out of the University of Florida. Physicists there have found a way […]

    Pingback by The Casimir force and nanotechnology « David Kirkpatrick — July 16, 2008 @ 12:54 am

  2. My name is Ruben Sanchez Matias and I am a student from Barcelona, Spain. I am currently writing a paper on British sense of humour. I read Alastair’s article which I found very interesting; therefore, I would appreciate it if you could answer some questions.
    Doubts
    – First of all, are there things considered “funny” by all societies?
    – Do you believe there is such a thing as British sense of humour?
    – Is humour a cultural or a biological phenomenon?
    – Do you agree with that pyramid? What would you change or what examples would you put in each part? What would you

    Thank you very much for your time, your opinion will be very important for me.

    Comment by Ruben Sanchez — November 11, 2008 @ 10:44 am


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