David Kirkpatrick

August 18, 2009

LinkedIn inks deal with SAP

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 4:11 pm

News from the world of corporate social networking.

From the link:

SAP has inked a deal with LinkedIn that will provide the software vendor’s channel partners with special tools and services for the popular business social-networking and careers site.The move is the first such agreement LinkedIn has formed with a software vendor, according to a statement. It is also the first instance of collaboration between the companies following an investment SAP’s venture capital arm made in LinkedIn last year.

The offer is available globally and is aimed at channel partners with up to 1,000 employees. It includes a special tool that helps partners find, track and contact appropriate candidates, as well as access to a job posting service on the site. SAP’s announcement indicates that partners will get a discount, but pricing information wasn’t immediately available Thursday.

Click here to find out more!Some 140,000 SAP consultants use LinkedIn, according to SAP.

You can find me at LinkedIn here: http://www.linkedin.com/in/davidkonline

March 20, 2009

LinkedIn privacy tutorial

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:54 pm

If you use LinkedIn, this is a must read.

You can find me on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/davidkonline

From the link:

Since LinkedIn doesn’t require you to share the same types of personal information as you do on Facebook, the service’s privacy settings appear to be much more straightforward than its less business-oriented competitor. But if you leave the default settings in place, you might be surprised to know what information you make public on LinkedIn.

February 16, 2009

Using LinkedIn company profiles for job search

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 11:36 am

For LinkedIn users who are looking for work, here’s a CIO.com article on utlizing LinkedIn company profiles when searching for jobs.

From the link:

Since LinkedIn Company Profiles launched nearly a year ago, more than 160,000 companies have established a profile page. If you’re job hunting in today’s struggling economy, LinkedIn company profiles can help you learn about companies on your short list in greater depth, according to career experts who have analyzed the service. Another bonus: a careful examination of LinkedIn contacts who have recently joined (or worked at) a company can help you determine if the organization would be a good fit, as you compare your own qualifications against the candidates hired.

After using the service and talking with experts, we’ve constructed a quick primer on LinkedIn company profiles and how you can start utilizing this resource right away for job hunting or networking.

January 23, 2009

LinkedIn goes after “super-connected”

The “super-connected” users and LinkedInhave been in something of a war. The super-connected claim they are providing a service and aren’t simply collectors of connections for bragging rights. LinkedIn says these users are defeating the spirit of the professional networking site.

The reality, as always, probably lies somewhere in between. The super-connected are undercutting some of LinkedIn’s profit channels, and once the connection list becomes too large the super-connected really can’t provide that much service for everyone on the list.

This warmish war just become a little more hot. Looks like LinkedIn has taken additional steps to rein-in the super-connected users.

For the record, I do utilize LinkedIn and have found it a great way to reconnect with previous colleagues (a real boon for a longtime freelancer like myself) and a resource to expand business contacts — I’m on a new freelance writing headhunter’s list because of the site. Just based on my interactions with the site I don’t see the utility of the super-connected, but I also see no reason to crack down on the group.

Of course, at the end of the day LinkedIn will win this head-to-head. It’s their site governed by a user’s agreement.

From the second link:

 LinkedInhas quietly clamped down on a controversial association known as the LinkedIn open networkers (LIONs), a group of LinkedIn members who liberally add contacts — known on LinkedIn as “connections” — even if they don’t know each of the people personally. The group’s strategy runs counter to LinkedIn’s official policy, which states that LinkedIn members should only connect with people they know .

In the recent development, some LIONs have received messages saying that they have exceeded a newly imposed connection limit of 30,000.LION members say they have pending “invitations to connect” that they cannot accept as a result of the restriction. An unofficial site known as the TopLinked.comtracks the connection counts of many LIONs.

The decision to place more restrictions on the LIONs comes several weeks after CIO.com profiled LinkedIn open networks and the group’s history. In the article, LIONs were described, at their best, as helping disparate strangers connect on the service, ideally leading to new jobs or business opportunities. At their worst, they are described by critics as name collectors looking to leverage their connection lists to spam unwitting members.

December 19, 2008

LinkedIn founder returns

Filed under: Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 12:28 am

An AP report via Technology Review:

After taking a back seat for nearly two years, LinkedIn Corp. founder Reid Hoffman is reclaiming the CEO’s job and bringing in former Yahoo Inc. executive Jeff Weiner to help steer the online professional network through its next phase of growth.

Hoffman’s return as chief executive, announced Wednesday, comes as a surprise, given LinkedIn’s success since he recruited Dan Nye to take over the reins of the Mountain View-based company in February 2007.

With Nye at the helm, privately held LinkedIn says it has been profitable as its revenue rose tenfold and the number of people creating profiles on its Web site more than quadrupled to 33 million.

The success helped LinkedIn raise $80 million in venture capital this year in a series of investments that valued the company at about $1 billion.

Find me on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/davidkonline

December 9, 2008

Do you use LinkedIn?

Filed under: Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 11:08 am

Here’s five tips from CIO.com.

From the link:

4. Your LinkedIn Connection List

There are two main factions who argue the merits of how one chooses connections on LinkedIn. One is LinkedIn itself. As CIO highlighted in a past article, LinkedIn firmly believes you should know your contacts before deciding to add them as a connection. They say they have designed the service with that philosophy in mind. Connections, they argue, are a reflection of you professionally. If you don’t know who they are, it can reflect poorly on you when people peruse your connection list.

On the other end of the spectrum are the LinkedIn Open Networkers, known as LIONs. A LION generally will add most people as a connection (whether they know them or not). Many LIONs build huge connection lists (thousands), and see value from doing this. According to the LION entry on wikipedia, they also adamantly discourage the use of the “I don’t know” button. “I don’t know” was designed by LinkedIn to discourage random, unknown connections. If it’s hit five times, a person can be blocked from LinkedIn or face consequences that prohibit their use of the service.

Dixson recommends taking somewhat of a middle ground between the two camps and work up a strategy you think makes sense for you and your profession. The key, she says, is having a consistent set of guidelines for adding connections.

But it will always be a murky issue, Dixson says. Perhaps, for instance, your criteria for adding a connection is that you know someone or have at least conducted business with them in the past. Well, what if, after you give a talk at a trade show or conference, a member of the audience writes and asks to connect with you on LinkedIn?

Dixson says it is fine to decline a connection, but that if such a case arises, it’s good form to explain why. For example, you might respond this way: “Thank you for reaching out. I’m glad you enjoyed my talk at the trade show. While I’m happy you contacted me, I don’t add connections until I’ve done business with a person directly. As such, feel free to e-mail me in the future and we can see what opportunities might come up in the future.”

If you are the one sending a connection, be sure to not use the canned invitation of “I’d like to add you as a connection” when sending the invite, especially if you feel you don’t know the person incredibly well or that their memory might need some prodding. At the very least, even if they decline it, they’ll be less likely to hit the dreaded “I don’t know” button.

Finally, make your connection list public, Dixson says. If you don’t, you are essentially defeating the purpose of LinkedIn. It’s a social network, and there isn’t anything more inherently unsocial than not allowing your contacts to connect with one another. The only exception would be is if you feel showing your connections would undermine your company’s competitive advantage.

Update — find me on LinkedIn here.

October 29, 2014

An appearance on the SalesFusion blog

I was recently interviewed by SalesFusion for their new “Industry Insight” feature. The results were published today in a blog post titled, “Industry Insights with David Kirkpatrick.” The interview covered my thoughts on marketing automation software and small- to medium-sized businesses (SMBs).

Thanks guys! It was a lot of fun being on the other side of the microphone for a change.

From the second link:

Salesfusion commenced Industry Insights, an interview series with industry analysts and marketing and sales experts. Industry Insights kicks off with an interview with David Kirkpatrick. David Kirkpatrick—award winning journalist, author and marketing expert—is Manager of Editorial Content for MECLABS, parent company of MarketingSherpa and MarketingExperiments.

August 18, 2010

Social networking advertising tops $1.5B

And not surprisingly Facebook is getting half of the $1.68 billion in social media/web 2.0 advertising forecasted for 2010. Facebook offers a very attractive advertising model in terms of very granular audience targeting coupled with a flexible set of criteria for creating an ad campaign. Expect to see more advertising dollars going into social networking in the future, particularly if it proves out to be very effective.

From the link:

Just after Facebook hit 500 million users last month, some analysts increased their 2010 forecasts for spending on social media advertising.

U.S. advertising is expected to increase 20% over last year to $1.68 billion, up from December’s forecast of $1.3 billion, according to a study by digital research group EMarketer.

“That’s primarily due to the strong performance of Facebook and somewhat due to the fact that we started adding Twitter to our analysis,” said Debra Aho Williamson, an analyst.

The study, conducted every six months, also measures sites such as MySpace, LinkedIn and Classmates.com as well as popular sites in China, Japan and Russia for worldwide figures.

Half of that $1.68 billion spent by U.S. advertisers will go to Facebook, according to the study. By 2011, advertisers will spend $1.06 billion on the San Francisco company — a 112% increase from 2009.

March 10, 2010

The barcode as bulletin board

Filed under: Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:16 pm

Via KurzweilAI.net — Interesting idea, but boy does this seem ripe for abuse. Imagine a bored fourteen-year-old boy armed with an Android phone and this app left alone in a grocery store. Video message pron anyone? Or malware compromised webpage for that matter.

The Secret Lives Of Objects: StickyBits Turn Barcodes Into Personal Message Boards
TechCrunch, Mar. 8, 2010

Stickybits, a new iPhone and Android app that lets you scan any barcode and attach a geo-tagged message to that physical object, has been launched by Stickybits.

The barcode in a greeting card, for instance, could trigger a video message from the sender. One on a box of medical supplies could inventory what is inside. A business card with a code on it could link to a resume or LinkedIn profile.

The app lets you follow people and see their object stream, or get notified whenever one of your objects is scanned, moved, or new bits are attached to them.

Stickybits is similar to science-fiction author Bruce Sterling’s concept of “Spimes.”
Read Original Article>>

February 19, 2010

The dangers of social networking

All those web 2.0 tools — blogging, Facebook, Twitter, MySpace (well, maybe not anymore), LinkedIn, Google Buzz (the new kid on the block), et.al. — are fun and somewhat addictive, but there are serious privacy dangers lurking in all that sharing.

Dangers as obvious as putting plenty of data out there for cybercriminals to harvest for phishing attempts and identity theft, not quite as obvious danger in putting discrete bits of corporate information out there in multiple locations that put together become useful to competitors, and even dangers as vanilla as broadcasting when you are home and not for local criminals seriously casing your home for a break-in.

That ought to be food for social networking thought.

From the link:

Pervasive social networking may herald the future’s most critical insider threat: cyber-chattiness.Individuals are simply revealing too much about their professional lives online. It might be possible, for example, to cross reference a Facebook post about a “big project that isn’t looking good” with other posts and piece together sensitive corporate information. And while a LinkedIn request for a job recommendation reveals a job seeker, two or more seekers in the same division could reveal company upheaval.

The threat from chatty insiders isn’t new, but a perfect storm might be brewing. Consider the following:

- People are broadcasting more of their lives online than ever before. More than 55 million status updates are posted every day on Facebook alone.

- A new batch of “Open Source Intelligence” tools now exist to help map out people’s lives and relationships.

- Lots of personal and business data online makes it easy for a hacker to personalize phishing attacks and in some cases, automate the personalization process. Tools and frameworks now exist to gather enough information about you online to custom craft emails that are very credible.

- Setting policies to stop employees from using these social networking sites at work doesn’t stop them from talking about work when online at home.

We are now starting to see some privacy stretch marks on the social networking bubble. Consider the case of Robert Morgan. Earlier this year Robert, a researcher at Microsoft (MSFT), updated his LinkedIn profile with details about his work on Windows 8 and its new 128-bit architecture. The problem was that Microsoft had never disclosed it was working on a 128-bit version of Windows (let alone working on Windows 8 or 9). This was a direct disclosure snafu made worse by the fact that anyone with an Internet connection could see it.

February 2, 2010

Protecting your online reputation

Filed under: Business, Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:52 pm

Easier said than done if someone is hell-bent on trashing you. CIO.com ran two articles today on online reputation — the first covers the how-to in protecting yourself online and the second lists five tools to use to help track what’s being said about you and where it’s being said. With the current plethora of web 2.0 applications out there — Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, FriendFeed, YouTube, and many more — there’s a lot of online real estate to cover when searching for mentions of yourself or your company.

From the first link:

As social sites with user-generated content such as Facebook, Twitter and WordPress continue to grow in popularity, and with Google’s announcement of real-time search, you must be aware of and manage your online reputation carefully now. “Social media has made our lives very transparent,” Laratro says. “If you maintain a professional persona, this can be something positive, but if you’re unaware of comments or pictures online that that you wouldn’t even want your mother to see, it can be terrible.”

Several free tools can help you keep tabs on what’s being said about you online. One of the most popular tools is a Google Alert for your name, which will automatically inform you when you’re referenced on a website.

May 11, 2009

Social networking and the job search

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:52 pm

If you are in the position of looking for work, here’s an article outlining how some job seekers found employment utilizing social network sites like Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

From the link:

Brennan Carlson ( Facebook and LinkedIn), a newly hired product manager at e-mail marketing firm Lyris Inc., is an extreme example. He took a highly organized, scientific approach to his job search when he was laid off from Yahoo Video last winter.

This included using custom search engines, Greasemonkey(a Firefox plug-in allowing customized Web page appearances via JavaScript), scripts running on top of Firefox, widgets, mashups, a spreadsheet and a customized Netvibes “start page”that organizes blogs, news, weather, photos and social networks. Carlson also made concentrated use of social networking sites to present himself online and to research targeted companies.

LinkedIn was one of the most useful tools he used, as it is for almost everyone else we interviewed. It’s also a key tool for IT hiring managers and recruiters looking for candidates. It has become the de-facto must-use tool in today’s career environment.

But whether it’s LinkedIn or one of the other myriad services, these Web tools are vital to today’s IT job search, Carlson said.

“If you’re not online, get online,” Carlson said. “Be everywhere. Start using these services. . . If you’re not on Twitter, get there. Start Tweeting.”

April 4, 2009

Social networking and privacy

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:09 pm

Privacy is the big bugaboo with social networking. Just ask Facebook after its terms of service debacle. This CIO.com article does a good job of laying out the importance of privacy (or lack there of for users) in terms of social networks being able to significantly monetize and how any social networking site is one security breach away from losing all the cards up its sleeve.

From the link:

As social networks like Facebook and LinkedInstrive to formulate sustainable business models built upon advertising or the selling of premium services, the biggest hurdle they face might rest within their users’ increased awareness of online privacy.

The common assumption that social networking users don’t care about privacy is misguided. The majority of people who use social networks (nearly 60 percent or more) have already modified their privacy settings, according to two separate research studies from the Pew Internet & American Life Project and School of Information and Library Science. Furthermore, privacy experts warn that an unfortunate (but perhaps inevitable) security breach that exposes user data over social networks in the coming years could cause a privacy tipping point in which users push back in a more substantive and widespread way.

“Privacy will become more important when the information is used for more nefarious reasons, like for stealing your identity,” says Larry Ponemon, president of the Ponemon Institute, a privacy research firm.

For their part, executives at major social networking sites and their advertisers argue that a culture of greater openness on the Web will prevail. They also say increased user attention to privacy could actually be advantageous to their business: If people feel comfortable with who can see their Facebook profile, for instance, they are more likely to be honest with the information they contribute to the network, which helps in serving up relevant ads that people might click on.

March 13, 2009

Tips for startups

Filed under: Business — Tags: , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 3:39 pm

This is a tough economic climate to put a shingle out for a new business. Here’s a short, but sweet, article on three tips for startups.

From the link:

Though, among other challenges, startups are in the unique position of needing to get their brand name recognized by the public, while a larger organization has to maintain its brand image. To keep employees and customers engaged, even through challenges, is to get involved online.

Setting up a profile on a site such as Twitter or LinkedIn has value, for even the most established brand. A company blog, or at least a press release feed helps both current and potential customers keep up to date with company news, and perhaps even add insight into how the company can better serve them. In addition, companies are quickly able to interact with clients. People want to work with people, not a faceless corporate organization. While networking in person is great, using smart online networking techniques is now just as important and is more cost efficient.

March 3, 2009

Using Twitter for job hunt

Filed under: Business, Technology — Tags: , , , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 2:21 pm

Here’s a CIO.com article on using Twitter when searching for work. I think every tool in the box should be utilized when on the employment hunt and Twitter is certainly of the moment.

You can follow me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/davidkonline.

From the first link:

Though LinkedIn tops the list of professionally-oriented social networks for job seeking, you can also use Twitter to get the word out about your skills and talents to relevant people in your industry.

But you must take some steps to be a good Twitter citizen before you tweet yourself into your next gig. We spoke with some career and social media experts on how to utilize Twitter for the purpose of job seeking, and the ways in which you can promote your own interests while helping others at the same time. (As you’ll find, you can’t do one without the other).

If you’re new to Twitter, we recommend reading our beginners’ guide to Twitter, as well as our Twitter etiquette guide, to learn more about what makes this community operate. Overall, it’s important to remember that Twitter is about exchanging ideas and letting people know more about you based on the content of your tweets.

August 15, 2008

Copyright ruling good news for open source software and others

Filed under: Arts, Business, et.al., Media, Technology — Tags: , , , , — David Kirkpatrick @ 4:03 pm

This ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington, D.C., is great news for open source software developers, and anyone who wishes to exert some level of control over their creative works whether sold or given away.

One example is the Creative Commonscopyright license project. This project is geared toward authors, scientists, artists and educators to allow people to define the rights they assert and the rights they offer for use.

I use a Creative Commons license when I post fiction online. The fiction I choose to post is offered for no-cost re-publication as long as it’s not for commercial purposes. If say a magazine or commercial website wanted to run one of my stories they would have to get in contact with me and either get my permission or come to terms for compensation. This way I can offer selected works of art to be freely shared and still “own” the commercial rights to the work. Just because I give it away for one purpose doesn’t mean I’m ceding the right to compensation in another context.

This is from the Creative Commons “about” page:

Creative Commons is a Massachusetts-chartered 501(c)(3) tax-exempt charitable corporation. For more information, see the corporate charter, by-laws, most recent tax return and most recent audited financial statement.

Creative Commons defines the spectrum of possibilities between full copyright — all rights reserved — and the public domain — no rights reserved. Our licenses help you keep your copyright while inviting certain uses of your work — a “some rights reserved” copyright.

Too often the debate over creative control tends to the extremes. At one pole is a vision of total control — a world in which every last use of a work is regulated and in which “all rights reserved” (and then some) is the norm. At the other end is a vision of anarchy — a world in which creators enjoy a wide range of freedom but are left vulnerable to exploitation. Balance, compromise, and moderation — once the driving forces of a copyright system that valued innovation and protection equally — have become endangered species.

Creative Commons is working to revive them. We use private rights to create public goods: creative works set free for certain uses. Like the free software and open-source movements, our ends are cooperative and community-minded, but our means are voluntary and libertarian. We work to offer creators a best-of-both-worlds way to protect their works while encouraging certain uses of them — to declare “some rights reserved.”

From the PhyOrg.com (way up in the first graf) link:

In a crucial win for the free software movement, a federal appeals court has ruled that even software developers who give away the programming code for their works can sue for copyright infringement if someone misappropriates that material.

The decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington, D.C., helps clarify a murky area of the law concerning how much control programmers can exert over their intellectual property once it’s been released for free into the so-called “open source” software community.

People are free to use that material in their own products, but they must credit the original authors of the programming code and release their modifications into the wild as well, a cycle that’s critical for free software to continue improving.

Because the code was given away for free, thorny questions emerge when a violation has been discovered and someone is found to have shoved the code into their own for-profit products without giving anything back, in the form of attribution and disclosure of the alterations they made.

Here’s the entry on this from the Creative Commons site:

Brian Rowe, August 13th, 2008

 

The United States Court of Appeals held that “Open Source” or public license licensors are entitled to copyright infringement relief.

The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC), the leading IP court in the United States, has upheld a free copyright license, while explicitly pointing to the work of Creative Commons and others. The Court held that free licenses such as the CC licenses set conditions (rather than covenants) on the use of copyrighted work.  As a result, licensors using public licenses are able to seek injunctive relief for alleged copyright infringement, rather than being limited to traditional contract remedies.

Creative Commons founder Lawrence Lessig explained the theory of all free software, open source, and Creative Commons licenses upheld by the court: “When you violate the condition, the license disappears, meaning you’re simply a copyright infringer. This is the theory of the GPL and all CC licenses. Put precisely, whether or not they are also contracts, they are copyright licenses which expire if you fail to abide by the terms of the license.” Lessig said the ruling provided “important clarity and certainty by a critically important US Court.”

Today’s ruling vacated the district court’s decision and affirmed the availability of remedies based on copyright law for violations of open licenses.  The federal court noted that ignoring attribution requirements contained in the license caused reputation and economic harm to the original licensor. This opinion demonstrates a strong understanding of a basic economic principles of the internet; attribution is a valuable economic right in the information economy.  Read the full opinion.(PDF)

 

Creative Commons filed a friends of the court brief in this case. Thanks to all the cosponsors Linux Foundation, The Open Source Initiative, Software Freedom Law Center, the Perl Foundation and Wikimedia Foundation.  Significant pro bono work on this brief was provided by Anthony T. Falzone and Christopher K. Ridder of Stanford’s Center for Internet & Society. Read the full brief.

Full Press Release

May 6, 2008

Reason mag interviews Peter Thiel

Here’s an interesting Reason interview with Peter Thiel, co-founder of PayPal and angel investor of Facebook. They discuss libertarianism, The Singularity and the ongoing progress of science.

From Ronald Baily’s introduction:

I first met Peter Thiel—co-founder of PayPal, angel investor in Facebook, founder of the hedge fund Clarium Capital Management, adviser to the Singularity Institute for Artificial Intelligence, and self-described libertarian—at a party in his San Francisco home last September. Perhaps 100 digerati wandered through Thiel’s sleek Marina District townhouse, chatting amiably over wine and canapés in rooms filled with up-to-the-minute abstract art.

The party launched the second annual Singularity Summit, held at the nearby Palace of Fine Arts during the ensuing two days. The Singularity, a term coined by the science fiction writer Vernor Vinge in 1983, refers to the eventual technological creation of smarter-than-human intelligence. Just as our model of physics breaks down when it tries to describe the center of a black hole, Vinge observed, our attempts to model the future break down when we try to foresee a world that contains smarter-than-human intelligences. The Singularity Institute takes it for granted that exponentially accelerating information technology will produce such artificial intelligences; its chief goal is to make sure they will be friendly to humans.

In 1987, while studying philosophy at Stanford, Thiel helped found the libertarian/conservative student newspaper The Stanford Review. As a law student at Stanford he was president of the university’s Federalist Society. After working briefly for the law firm Sullivan and Cromwell in New York, Thiel switched to trading derivatives for Credit Suisse Financial. In the mid-1990s, Thiel transformed himself into a venture capitalist and a serial entrepreneur. He returned to California, where he has backed a number of startups. In addition to PayPal and Facebook, Thiel has invested in the social networking site LinkedIn, the search engine company Powerset, and the Web security provider IronPort.

Thiel also joined the culture wars by co-authoring The Diversity Myth: Multiculturalism and the Politics of Intolerance at Stanford (1996), and was an executive producer for the 2005 feature film Thank You for Smoking, based on Christopher Buckley’s politically incorrect novel of the same name. Besides backing the Singularity Institute, Thiel pledged a $3.5 million matching grant in 2006 to the Methuselah Foundation to support its anti-aging research agenda.

I interviewed Thiel between sessions at the Singularity Summit.

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